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Old 11-24-2011, 09:37 PM   #1
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Red face Help with leading

I have a 3 yr. Quarter mare that is usually good about everything, except she gets too excited when I get her to the arena to turn her out. Once we are barely inside the gate she takes off before I can get the lead rope off. I can walk up to her eaisly & get it off but this sometimes happens so quickly. I've tried using a rope halter which is okay, util we get inside the it's off to the races. I want to get this stopped because it is dangerous & I don't want her to have any sustained idea she's in control. Any suggestions would be very much appreciated, thanks.
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Old 11-24-2011, 11:56 PM   #2
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When you walk up to the arena, have her stop, then back up, then turn around (forcing her away from you) and then walk away from the arena. Then approach again, if she starts giving any antsy signals repeat the above before entering. If you can get her into the arena don't let her go right away, make her work and listen first.

That's what I would do, others will chime in with what has worked for them as well .
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Old 11-25-2011, 11:32 AM   #3
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Thanks!

Thank you for the suggestion. I'll try it today & post back.
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Old 03-18-2013, 10:48 AM   #4
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I gather you turn her out with her halter on
I agree with turning her towards you, then making her stand for a few minutes, before taking off the lead rope.
You can also apply a modification of what I do when a horse tries to leave quickly, when I take the halter off
Again, I make the horse face me, I also have on two halters and two lead shanks. Tell the horse whoa, AND WHEN THEY GO TO TAKE OFF AS SOON AS THEY FEEL THAT BUCKLE BEING UNDONE-SURPRISE! I will give them a sharp jerk with the bottom lead shank and halter, and repeat 'whoa'
You could try and attach two lead shanks, if turning her out with a halter on.
Un snap the first one, and when she tries to peel out of there (she will need to pivot, as she is facing you ) jerk her back around in her tracks with that second lead shank. Re attach that first lead shank, and repeat the sequence until she is standing there waiting for you to release her. When she is standing quietly and waiting, un do the snap, and step back. That is her signal that it is okay to leave
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Old 03-21-2013, 08:56 AM   #5
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Good advice, just be careful-a friend was kicked in the face & chest when his horse took off after being released and bucked at the same time. A good reason to have the horse face you. If you can release her next a tree where she can't just spin and go, that might help a bit.
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Old 03-21-2013, 10:34 AM   #6
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I'd be careful with backing the horse. Although this can be good and I see where the poster is coming from, backing a horse already that excited could lead to a rearing situation.

Usually with mine, I read their body language to begin with. I can tell when they are going to do it, before they do it. If I sense they think they are going to tear out of there, I make them wait and use my own body language and verbal commands.

If they don't settle, I don't release them. I have one horse that can be such a nut b/c he just wants to go run that when he won't settle, I have taken him back to the barn paddocks and he does not get to 'go out'. This keeps him guessing as to if he will be released this time or if it's just a walk. So he anticipates your actions less. Through the use of verbal commands, firm leading and your own body language (cues) they figure out you are the alpha and listen.
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Old 04-07-2013, 07:35 PM   #7
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i had a horse when i was 10 that that would do the same thing then i would turn her out, She ended up running me over and breaking my shoulder, arm and hand. I was alone and had to drive 45 minutes to the hospital alone.
We got over it slowly. But, make sure you have someone around, just in case.
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Old 04-08-2013, 03:36 AM   #8
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Are you able to turn her after you get her in there? If you are not able to turn her or have complete control when you get her in the arena, personally I would put a chain over her nose and give her a good jerk if she tries to take off or turn on you. I know some people don't like that but I think if used properly it can be a good training tool on a strong pulling horse. It won't take her any time if you are firm with her. I would also not let her go until she calms down.
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Old 04-10-2013, 06:24 PM   #9
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I walk in at least 10 feet, turn so back is to gate and make horse back, without making any move to drop halter at all. Then I make him stand still.

When I go to drop halter, I ask horse to back at same time as I step back, that way if horse goes to wheel and kick? I'm out of the way.
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Old 04-10-2013, 09:46 PM   #10
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Change the routine. You say she's takes off before you remove the lead rope. I agree with most people here, it's very important to have the horse facing you when you do turn out. I too have seen terrible accidents with people being kicked from a buck when the horse is turned out because of excitability.

When I worked on the horse that actually did kick his owner while being turned out, I wouldn't immediately turn out the horse. If he started running over me, I had a dressage crop in hand, would turn, tap him on the chest and back him up until he learned respectful distance.

I then taught the horse to bend at the poll, and we would do different stretches (I taught him to bow, bend, worked on transitions when it came time). Eventually the gelding learned what I expected from him and could be safely turned out, and part of the reason was he didn't know if I was going to be asking him to work first, and play later.

I know how hard this can be with a young horse. I had a young thoroughbred who would get a bug in his butt the second he was going to be turned out. So I stopped turning him out first, - we went to the round pen and lunged, worked on transitions, and eventually started working at liberty in the round pen which he became great at. When we moved into the arena where he was turned out, I would ask the same thing, and then it was play time when I decided.

The at liberty work really helped with safely turning my gelding out. If he expected it to be play time, I turned it into work time. My general training motto is make the naughty thing the horse is doing harder, and then reward it with what it wants. If your horse is mowing you down and taking off when you turn him out, make him work, work, work and then turn him out.

While I understand where people come from with the backing can also lead to rearing, this is a problem I've never had and I really generally results in a horse getting mixed of confused cues about what is expected of it.

I also just have to ask, how well does this horse understand 'WHOA'. If your horse doesn't know that whoa means stop, no more steps, start there, or you could end up in a dangerous situation.
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Old 04-14-2013, 08:05 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by SingerHed View Post
i had a horse when i was 10 that that would do the same thing then i would turn her out, She ended up running me over and breaking my shoulder, arm and hand. I was alone and had to drive 45 minutes to the hospital alone.
We got over it slowly. But, make sure you have someone around, just in case.
Off subject, but it caught my eye- you were 10 and driving? Alone?
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Old 04-25-2013, 12:26 PM   #12
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Off subject, but it caught my eye- you were 10 and driving? Alone?

When you live in the middle of nowhere on a farm, you learn to drive young... When you injured and cant get ahold of anyone, you do what ya gotta do. It was go to the hospital or wait til someone came home.
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Old 05-09-2013, 07:26 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SingerHed View Post
i had a horse when i was 10 that that would do the same thing then i would turn her out, She ended up running me over and breaking my shoulder, arm and hand. I was alone and had to drive 45 minutes to the hospital alone.
We got over it slowly. But, make sure you have someone around, just in case.
you drove when you were 10 ??
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Old 06-17-2013, 08:24 AM   #14
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All good advice here; I don't have anything to really add.

But on the subject of driving young- a farmer friend of my family's has sons that have been driving farm machinery since they were around 5!
If I knew how to drive and needed to get somewhere in an emergency, I'd drive, no matter the age. I am somewhat impressed though, that a kid in that much pain could think through driving to the hospital. I feel like many kids would be way too busy freaking out.
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