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Old 12-17-2008, 07:58 AM   #1
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Swollen right front knee - HELP

I was leaving for work this morning and looked over at my horses to make sure everything was still okay. I saw my 1 1/2 year old stud colt limping on three legs!! He was fine yesterday.

I quickly got out of my car (left it running too) walked over and saw his right front knee swollen twice the size it should be.

He is able to put weight on it when at rest, but any movement he brings the leg up.

Confined him to my barn asle - its about two stalls length - as he cannot be stalled out of sight of other horses (has the baby social-anxiety).

Felt only a little heat in the knee, but overall just feels fluid-y. Wary when I touched his knee, but didn't seem overly in pain with my touch. Looks like it is spreading down to below the knee. No heat in hooves, other legs look fine, no scratches or bumps or cuts.

Checked the field saw nothing out of the ordinary, no wires jumbled or fence boards out of place.

New vet I called has a portable x-ray machine and should be here in a hour. I know exactly what my current vet would do, she'd come out check his leg and then say he needs hauled to her hospital for x-rays, so I'm knocking her vet bill plus the hospital bill out... plus my horse trailer is 30 minutes away at a friends house & I am not very inclined to agree with any hauling of a three legged injuried horse. Which is why I called a completely new-to-me-and-new-to-the-area vet coming out.

Obviously I called in to work to explain the situation and let them know I'll be in late or will call again to let them know I'm not coming.

This boy has/had huge plans on his future plate, I never imagined him to get hurt.
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Old 12-17-2008, 08:32 AM   #2
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Wouldn't panic just yet. Babies are prone to much sillyness and the occassional don't know how it happened injury.

More than likely he played to hard and slipped and or bumped it just right. Advantageous to be so young as well, I am sure you will be much relieved once the vet takes a look.
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Old 12-17-2008, 03:44 PM   #3
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My colt has a fracture in his splint bone.

Been since 7:30 this morning being the vet, hunting down bedding, supplements, overly spoiling my boy until now.

Going to get quotes from nearby hospitals for possible surgery if no improvement in 30 days.

Vet wrapped him from chest to hoof. Have him on 10 days of Bute and 15 days of antibiotics.

My colt's age may play a good factor in the healing process so may heal without surgery. Waiting 30 days to take new x-rays and re-evaluate then. Stall rest till then.

I went to the feed store and purchased Remission a founder preventitive/helper - just in case, Calm N'Cool to relieve his herd-anxiety, and gluscosamine (spelling sorry) + MSM + other stuff I can't recall.

At this point I'm just trying to get him pasture sound (hopefully breeding sound or sound enough to at least go to an warmblood inspection for their conformation approvals), I seriously doubt he will ever recover to what I was hoping he would do, something he was bred for... jumping/eventing.

Does anyone have any suggestions on supplements or products to help him recover? Or a hospital somewhat near my location that could do those technician/student exam type surgeries at very little cost?
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Old 12-17-2008, 03:52 PM   #4
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We do these all the time here........I actually have a surgeon that removes the splint bones right here on the farm...It is not a big deal and they heal well.........The problem with leaving them in there is that they cause pressure to the suspensory ligament and that is what you will have problems with the suspensory........not the splint bone.........By all means have it removed, and it should not be a very expensive surgery to have done, recovery time 60 days or so, stall rest imperative, have them give him a shot of reserpine and call it a day, I would not mess with the supplements they just don't work very well for this type of calming..........I have a surgeon that works up in Delaware but is here in Florida for the winter he won't be back up that way until April, he does this procedure........I do have another one you may be able to call in Maryland that is awesome if you want to call him and see if he can do it.........
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Old 12-17-2008, 03:57 PM   #5
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I went back and looked at your films again and if I were you I would stall rest this horse very strictly for 60 days, and get a set of progressive x-rays done..........I think it will heal well, if you stick to a very strict rest program, the location of the break is not one that make me want to operate on it, I would want to try to get it to remodel on its own, he is young and he should be able to heal well, and return to full use..........
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Old 12-17-2008, 05:12 PM   #6
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Oh, I am so sorry to hear. Was certainly hoping that it was nothing more than a strain. Kudos for being an excellant horsie Mom and having the Vet out right away. Sending speedy complete healing thoughts out for your little guy.
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Old 12-18-2008, 08:04 AM   #7
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I am sorry to hear the bad news! I want to reassure you a little bit though, our boarder's horse broke his splint bone in the back by trying to do a sliding stop... on hard ground.... without sliders.... and he's not a reiner. It just snapped! 3 months later he was sound as ever. His hock is still a little bigger, but not noticible unless you know about the injury. SO here's to a speedy recovery for your guy! I bet he will be sound enough for flat work!
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Old 12-18-2008, 01:56 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kanoo32 View Post
I went back and looked at your films again and if I were you I would stall rest this horse very strictly for 60 days, and get a set of progressive x-rays done..........I think it will heal well, if you stick to a very strict rest program, the location of the break is not one that make me want to operate on it, I would want to try to get it to remodel on its own, he is young and he should be able to heal well, and return to full use..........
Thank you for your advice!

I am going to be very strict with his stall rest. He is currently in my "pony" stall - 9x12. With vet approval, will then move him to one of my other stalls 12x13... then progress to the barn asle (24+x24+) and eventually to the 60 foot round pen. Each larger turnout area would be vet checked first.

My colt will not have any opinion on that.
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Old 12-18-2008, 02:00 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seerfarm View Post
Oh, I am so sorry to hear. Was certainly hoping that it was nothing more than a strain. Kudos for being an excellant horsie Mom and having the Vet out right away. Sending speedy complete healing thoughts out for your little guy.
I was to hoping for just a pulled ligament or sprain anything but something cracked or broken.
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Old 12-18-2008, 02:02 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sirita_88 View Post
I am sorry to hear the bad news! I want to reassure you a little bit though, our boarder's horse broke his splint bone in the back by trying to do a sliding stop... on hard ground.... without sliders.... and he's not a reiner. It just snapped! 3 months later he was sound as ever. His hock is still a little bigger, but not noticible unless you know about the injury. SO here's to a speedy recovery for your guy! I bet he will be sound enough for flat work!
Oh my. That poor horse... was he in a stall for 3 months?
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Old 12-18-2008, 02:04 PM   #11
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I am so sorry to hear this.. but I agree with Kanoo.. he is young, and with the care you are providing him - and your working so closely with the vet - I foresee a real positive outcome for him...

Prayers headed your way that he remains calm and heals to be 100% sound and healthy..
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Old 12-18-2008, 02:08 PM   #12
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Sorry about your horse's fracture But, while he is favoring one leg, you need to use a good supportive bandage/wrap on his good leg or he will go lame there too. His good leg will be trying to support all his weight and will need all the help it can get to maintain. You can also use a good liniment under the wrap to help (nothing that will blister though). Good luck, I hope he comes through with flying colors.
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Old 12-18-2008, 02:19 PM   #13
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Yes, I agree with the wrapping for support. Also consider his diet as it plays a huge roll.

I had a yearling who broke his right front sesamoid clear across and seperated it. With strict stall rest, supportive leg wraps, massages to help with blood flow in his other legs and a strict diet he was sound at 3 months out. He is now 8 1/2 and hasn't taken a lame step since.
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Old 12-19-2008, 12:46 PM   #14
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What is everyone's opinion on looking at a very small mini as a stall companion?

I have toys, attention, and plenty of licking treats & mineral blocks for him... but he is starting to get bored, antsy, and lonely.

My pony mare I'm keeping in the barn asle for the most part stays right at the beginning of the barn (whereas his stall is at the back - its the most open to view everything). She does not like my colt since he is at the bottom of the herd and at the moment she only has eyes for my boss gelding - she's in heat.

I was tossing around the idea of a small young mini or older mini for temporary companion use (or permanent if I fall in love with it). Granted they would not be in the same stall until my colt can move into a bigger stall & they are good with each other.... BUT I would try to confine the mini within smell & touch of him til then.
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Old 12-19-2008, 12:58 PM   #15
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I think putting someone out in the isle or in a stall next to him is a better option. If the mini doens't know him already, you don't want them getting into it and the baby kicked in the leg. If the mare doesn't like him maybe another male horse or pony?

I think with stall rest he'll be fine. It may take him some time to get used to being confined but he should quiet down. Give pleanty of yummy hay, maybe an uncle jimmys hangin ball for him to lick and keep busy!

If you need a vet. I have a direct contact at new bolton. She is excellent! Also there's a good hospital right next to the Charlestown Race track in WV. They're good too!

Best wishes and ((Hugs))
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Old 12-19-2008, 03:00 PM   #16
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Quote:
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I think putting someone out in the isle or in a stall next to him is a better option. If the mini doens't know him already, you don't want them getting into it and the baby kicked in the leg. If the mare doesn't like him maybe another male horse or pony?

I think with stall rest he'll be fine. It may take him some time to get used to being confined but he should quiet down. Give pleanty of yummy hay, maybe an uncle jimmys hangin ball for him to lick and keep busy!

If you need a vet. I have a direct contact at new bolton. She is excellent! Also there's a good hospital right next to the Charlestown Race track in WV. They're good too!

Best wishes and ((Hugs))

The sad thing is... the other 3 horses (includes the pony mare) worry more about each other then my colt, since he is so submissive, both mares "love" the top boss gelding & the boss could care less about my boy since the boss prefers the girls (but luckily isn't stallion-like).

I was thinking about confining a mini closer to his stall (rather then free range inside the barn isle like the pony mare has now which doesn't seem to be giving my boy the company he is needing from another equine since she prefers to stay at the opposite side) that way they could touch noses and such... and if they seem to get along then once vet approves my colt to move into a bigger stall then try them together (which obviously won't happen for a while).
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Old 12-19-2008, 03:09 PM   #17
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Perhaps making the space outside his stall smaller could help, but I agree it is to risky to have another horse small or not in the same space. The chances of something happening and him injuring that leg further are not worth it. IMO
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Old 12-19-2008, 03:37 PM   #18
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I'm sorry to hear about your boy. We will be praying for a safe recovery.

A thing I noticed that works well on bumbs "aka calcium deposits" and swellings:

A dmso/papya mixture, bute for 3 days then start on glucosimine/condridon if its still bugging them. And cold hosing and stall rest.
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Old 12-19-2008, 03:40 PM   #19
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Just lock him up and that is it, you fretting over him and making a big deal of it makes it harder for him.........Thin of it this way, the confinement is a very short period of his life overall!......I do not understand why people have such a hard time with this concept......A companion is a bad idea, because then he bedomes dependent on the companion.......Get him some sedatives if he needs to be calmer or send him out to someone that can do it........
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