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Old 10-30-2006, 09:55 AM   #1
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Diarrhea w/Runny Eye

Whenever my horse gets nervous or anxious, he will get diarrhea for half a day and then it passes. Romeo has had diarrhea for 2 days now and his left eye is cloudy and runny. I know he has allergies and his eye will tear but this is leaving a crust. The board owner, (not a vet) thinks it could be a slight cold do to the change in weather or the fact that the grass is all but gone and now they are getting more grain (the diarrhea). In any case, I’m calling the vet today and see what he thinks.

I’ll post any input he gives us incase any one has a similar situation with their horse.
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Old 10-30-2006, 01:58 PM   #2
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Yes, absolutely call your vet. Eyes especially are easily injured, a cloudy, runny one can be a red alert situation in my opinion. Good luck.
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Old 10-30-2006, 02:06 PM   #3
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I agree - call the vet... and please let us know how it turns out.
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Old 10-30-2006, 09:06 PM   #4
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Yup, call the vet. Also, sometime when the grass dies off, if they do not have hay to eat outside, they may get into some toxic weeds.
Also eyes are nothing to fool with. And an easy antibiotic cream [from vet] can make all the difference in the world.
good luck
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Old 10-31-2006, 08:47 AM   #5
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I called the vet and he said to keep an eye on Romeo and to call him in the morning. I guess he felt it was not such a big deal. I could not insist that he come to see Romeo because the vet was in and out of surgery all day. Romeo still has a very soft stool. His temp is normal. I am off to go see him right now and to call the vet if there is no change.

Thanks everyone - your thoughts and kindness mean everything!
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Old 10-31-2006, 08:57 AM   #6
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If his eye is cloudy, I would really want to get a vet out to see him ASAP.

Good luck and I hope Romeo is feeling better soon!
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Old 10-31-2006, 11:28 AM   #7
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I hope Romeo is ok. And how did you make out when you went to see him? Has the vet come out? Please keep us posted....
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Old 10-31-2006, 05:51 PM   #8
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Hi everyone,

His eye is clear now and there is no seepage. His stool is still lose but not as bad. The vet came out and "thinks" it may be a slight touch of colitis or something he had eaten out in the pasture... like that of a bad weed. The vet did not find any sand in his stool and said his weight is perfect. He gave Romeo a shot of something that starts with a B (sorry I forget the name). The vet will be back in 2 days to check on him again. Of course, I will call if things get worse but he thinks he is on the side of getting over it.

No grain or pasture feeding until he is better. Hay only and lots of water with electrolytes.
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Old 10-31-2006, 07:05 PM   #9
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Glad to hear he is doing better!
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Old 11-01-2006, 12:53 AM   #10
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Good news! I think a smart thing for every horseowner to have on hand is a book describing plants that can be toxic to horses. If there is something in your pasture, chances are he may have trouble again. A good one is Horse Owners Field Guide To Toxic Plants by Sandra Burger. I got a used/like new copy from Amazon for about $12.00
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Old 11-01-2006, 05:07 AM   #11
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Probably Banamine - relaxes the gut muscles and prevents spasms..

Sounds great - glad to hear he is doing fine!
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Old 11-01-2006, 06:59 AM   #12
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The book is a great idea! Also a good thing to keep on hand is charcoal paste [something like that, you can get it from the vet] It will absorb toxins from the gut - good for grain overload as well.
If he did eat something toxic, keep an eye on his feet -check for heat.
Sometimes founder can happen after digestive upset.
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Old 11-01-2006, 10:02 AM   #13
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It is a good idea but we are boarders. Don't think that would go over well Off to see how he's feeling.
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Old 11-01-2006, 10:04 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gbarmranch
Probably Banamine - relaxes the cut muscles and prevents spasms..
That's it! Thanks
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Old 11-06-2006, 09:07 AM   #15
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All better now!

We think it was nothing more then a change in diet. The grass is almost gone and the grain and hay have increased. We noticed that a few other horses had the same problem. In any case, he is feeling much better and his stool is formed again.

So with that said, he is back to being the same little brat in the saddle and it's pleasure
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Old 11-06-2006, 01:21 PM   #16
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Frankie, just for future reference, my vet said to call anytime there is true diarrhea. If it's a loose stool, you want to watch it closely, but diarrhea warrants an emergency call. That's because the digestion track in a horse is so long that most of the time a horse that has diarrhea will absorb most of the water before it reaches the anus. Consequently, if a horse has diarrhea, it's usually something pretty severe and/or serious. I never knew that until recently so I thought I'd pass it on to you.
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Old 11-06-2006, 03:24 PM   #17
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Thank you for the information!
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