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Old 01-02-2013, 09:32 AM   #1
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salt block color codes

Thought I would post this ,as it seems at times there is confusion as to what different salt blocks, coded by color, contain
For instance, red salt blocks contain salt and iodine, and not minerals.
The brown blocks are trace mineral blocks


Answer: White salt blocks contain nothing but salt. Blue salt blocks contain cobalt and iodine as well as salt. Brown salt blocks contain additional minerals. Red blocks contain iodine. While trace iodine may be beneficial or harmless, some red salt contains very high iodine and shouldn’t be fed to horses—read the label to be sure you are choosing a low iodine block.

Salt mineral blocks are favored by many horse owners and may be beneficial if you like the idea of added mineral content. Some brown blocks contain mineral only—read the label when buying. You won’t be making a mistake by feeding white salt. But a problem arising from offering colored salts is unlikely.
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Old 01-02-2013, 09:50 AM   #2
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I offer white and brown both. Sometimes they focus on the white, sometimes on the brown for a while.

I haven't seen the red or blue blocks. They must not be as widely used.
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Old 01-02-2013, 10:02 AM   #3
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what is everyone's feelings on redmond rocks?

http://www.redmondequine.com
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Old 01-02-2013, 11:03 AM   #4
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I would be concerned with buying a salt block based on color. Wouldn't it be best to check the label or with the store if it is not labled to be sure you know exactly what you are getting?

I would imagine that there is the potential for new products to be released (if there aren't already) that do not follow what is normal for salt/mineral blocks.

Those molasses cow blocks that most horses will eat like candy are brown...
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Old 01-02-2013, 11:49 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by voiceofreason View Post

Those molasses cow blocks that most horses will eat like candy are brown...
. . . but not all brown blocks are molasses blocks. (If they were, mine would have disappeared long ago.)

Read the label, of course.
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Old 01-02-2013, 12:20 PM   #6
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Coming from a nutritionist...manufactured salt blocks, no matter what color they are, are a minimum of 97% NaCl salt. If you are feeding anything besides white salt in a block form, you are--IMO--wasting your money. Macro nutrients should be fed in loose form to assure that they get delivered. And, again IMO, salt should be supplemented in loose form as well because horses can't lick a block enough to meet their salt requirements. That said...I have white salt blocks in all my stalls and turnouts, but as a boredom buster. I topdress a complete salt/mineral in loose form to meet at least 2/3 of their daily requirements.
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Old 01-02-2013, 05:04 PM   #7
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good post smilie.

I have a couple Redmond rocks. Some horses seem to like them, some don't seem to understand they are edible. And a certain husband keeps wanting to take the rock out of the pasture...at their price point, not sure they are worth it on a large scale, but the one tricky horse I have (mystery health issues) gets one.

Around here it is hard to find white salt blocks, so mine get the blue ones. I don't feel it is wasting money, as they are cheap. Apparently the local feed mill is going to start making salt blocks, so curious as to if they come up with something specific for horses...although not sure what that would be/mean.
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Old 01-02-2013, 05:51 PM   #8
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So EA, in our northern environment, with all its challenges, would blue blocks ad lib, and top dressing feed with loose Hoffmans minerals cover all possibilities?
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Old 01-02-2013, 06:18 PM   #9
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Probably a better question for Smilie as she knows more about nutrition than I do, but that seems to work for many.
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Old 01-02-2013, 06:43 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by voiceofreason View Post
I would be concerned with buying a salt block based on color. Wouldn't it be best to check the label or with the store if it is not labled to be sure you know exactly what you are getting?

I would imagine that there is the potential for new products to be released (if there aren't already) that do not follow what is normal for salt/mineral blocks.

Those molasses cow blocks that most horses will eat like candy are brown...
No, not molasses brown cow protein blocks!
Salt blocks, if specified are just that-salt blocks
Now protein and mineral blocks can be various colors and composition, but they are not sold as salt blocks
White salt blocks plain NaCl I don't use them , because I;ve known of horses that are thyroid difficient in this area. However, you also don't want to over feed iodine\, so if adding loose salt to beet pulp, to encourage drinking, I use loose white salt

Red Salt blocks-NaCl + Iodine

Blue NaCl + lower level of iodine plus cobalt

Brown salt blocks Mainly NaCl with trace minerals-not sufficient mineral content, so I use a horse mineral block + a blue salt block
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Old 01-02-2013, 06:46 PM   #11
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Smilie, can I buy a real mineral block??

I usually have the salt blocks, and top dress with Hoffmans, but I would like something like Hoffmans in a block form, but anything that I see described as a mineral block for horses has molasses in them, and it is like candy to my lot.

Is there a good way to feed loose minerals ad lib, they just knock over tubs
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Old 01-02-2013, 06:51 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Knight before Christmas View Post
So EA, in our northern environment, with all its challenges, would blue blocks ad lib, and top dressing feed with loose Hoffmans minerals cover all possibilities?
Yes, that would be a good plan
I used to use red salt blocks, but was told that cobalt is good for horses also, plus the iodine is lower in it than in the red.
I like Hoffmans, but since my horses are outside, I feed a semi soft mineral block for horses (no molasses )(it is not really soft, but can be a bit crumbly
Since I have Smilie, who is IR, I am really fanatical that none of my suppliments or feed have molasses added
The block comes in a bag, with the minerals listed, but unfortunately I don't have a bag handy, but if you need more info, will make a point of getting that info next time i go to town
I forget what it is exactly called, but I get it at Hi Pro (used to be Viterra, and before that Unifeed ) It costs around $45 . Since i like to feed minerals free choice, I find it stands up better to our weather than loose, or I would use Hoffmans

Last edited by Smilie; 01-02-2013 at 07:03 PM.
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Old 01-02-2013, 06:54 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Knight before Christmas View Post

Is there a good way to feed loose minerals ad lib, they just knock over tubs
I found the feeders in a farm supply store, but they didn't know what I was talking about when I asked for the salt/minerals. I asked, "What are they for?" and they said, "Oh, you can put anything in them." Then they suggested using them for vitamin supplements. (The label clearly said it was for salt and minerals.)
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Old 01-02-2013, 07:11 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockin GR View Post
Coming from a nutritionist...manufactured salt blocks, no matter what color they are, are a minimum of 97% NaCl salt. If you are feeding anything besides white salt in a block form, you are--IMO--wasting your money. Macro nutrients should be fed in loose form to assure that they get delivered. And, again IMO, salt should be supplemented in loose form as well because horses can't lick a block enough to meet their salt requirements. That said...I have white salt blocks in all my stalls and turnouts, but as a boredom buster. I topdress a complete salt/mineral in loose form to meet at least 2/3 of their daily requirements.
Definately not enough minerals in those brown salt blocks with trace minerals, and why I also use a mineral block, and not a salt block with trace minerals
Also, one point to think about, while all of our white table salt is iodized, those white horse blocks are not, so if you are only going to feed horses white salt, make sure they are getting iodine from somewhere in their diet
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Old 01-02-2013, 09:32 PM   #15
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This company makes good mineral blocks for horses :

http://www.canadianagriblend.com/agriblend_equest.htm

Easier than loose minerals for sure. What I found interesting too, is that they are regularly inspected to ensure they have the contents they claim to have. High quality product.
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Old 01-02-2013, 09:37 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EquineAlberta View Post
I have a couple Redmond rocks. Some horses seem to like them, some don't seem to understand they are edible. And a certain husband keeps wanting to take the rock out of the pasture...at their price point, not sure they are worth it on a large scale, but the one tricky horse I have (mystery health issues) gets one.
I was wondering how horses liked them. I have one that I got free at equine affair....I may just try it to see what my 3 think of it
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Old 01-03-2013, 01:08 AM   #17
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No, not molasses brown cow protein blocks!
Salt blocks, if specified are just that-salt blocks
Now protein and mineral blocks can be various colors and composition, but they are not sold as salt blocks
White salt blocks plain NaCl I don't use them , because I;ve known of horses that are thyroid difficient in this area. However, you also don't want to over feed iodine\, so if adding loose salt to beet pulp, to encourage drinking, I use loose white salt

Red Salt blocks-NaCl + Iodine

Blue NaCl + lower level of iodine plus cobalt

Brown salt blocks Mainly NaCl with trace minerals-not sufficient mineral content, so I use a horse mineral block + a blue salt block

My point is that in different parts of the country, you may find things that do not match up with your "color code", thus, its best to know exactly what you are buying, by reading the label rather than just going off a color code.
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Old 01-03-2013, 09:45 AM   #18
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yes, one should always read labels, esp buying anything for horses, designed also for other species, like cattle
You also should know if you are buying salt blocks, mineral blocks or protein blocks
Far as I know, until proven otherwise, the color code of SALT blocks in North America are universal
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Old 01-15-2017, 06:08 PM   #19
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Mineral Block

When I have my large brown mineral block in a rubber type bowl under a shelter for my horse, every so often there appears to be water in it. Could my horse be peeing on it (Strange) or could he be taking a mouthful of water then going straight to the salt block. Seems like a lot of water though??? I have tipped it out a number of times but now I have taken it out of the bowl and just have it on the ground. It does't seem to be wet anymore??? Any ideas? Also after reading some of the posts about the different types of blocks, I had been wondering whether to put a blue salt block in his paddock also. I think you guys have helped me answer my question so I will get one of those too. I do use the blue one in he summer months.
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Old 01-16-2017, 08:19 PM   #20
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every so often there appears to be water in it.

I know what you mean, and I've seen this too. My theory has always been that it has to do with condensation. I don't know that I've ever read this or been told it, but it seems to me like if the salt block is cold to the touch in the way metal is cold to the touch, then it can be an attractor of water from out of the air, just like a glass of iced tea on a humid summer day.
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