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Old 06-28-2008, 11:19 AM   #1
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Crossing Feet

Does anyone know what may cause the following -

A little background - Koli is a 20 yr old Arabian. He has arthritis in his hocks but has been feeling quite well lately. He also gets pain in his withers from time to time today definitely being one of those times. IF a saddle is used at all, he's ridden in a treeless saddle. Normally he is ridden bareback.

Symptoms - with pressure on his withers, particularly his right side, his head shoots up and it's quite obviously painful. That is concerning but even moreso is at a walk his front feet are criss crossing. On the forward his left foot is going way to the right in front of and to the outside of the right foot and then when he brings the right forward it is going way to the left of the left foot. We didn't ask anything above a walk because his gait was already unsteady. No one has ridden him in a few days and the barn owner said he has seemed fine - she spends a lot of time with the horses so she would have noticed.

Any ideas?
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Old 06-28-2008, 01:01 PM   #2
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I need to add that he doesn't normally do this cross over walking. And I dont even know what to call it to look it up on the net? Any help would be awesome.
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Old 06-28-2008, 01:14 PM   #3
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I really have no advice or idea what it could be... I'm just curious though how he is not falling over? It sounds like he's acting drunk or something with that walk.... would make me think possibly something nurelogical sp?
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Old 06-28-2008, 01:45 PM   #4
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thanks Cascy, I will have to look into some neurological reasons. He doesn't do this all the time though...he has been fine until today...it's very weird. He's not toppling over but sure looks like he should.
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Old 06-28-2008, 02:07 PM   #5
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I beleive EPM and westniles, along with some other issues attach "neurolgicoly" (sorry can't spell that for the life of me...)

You might want to call your vet and ask about it
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Old 06-28-2008, 02:39 PM   #6
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I just went thru something similar to this a few months ago. I had him tested at the vets and it came back postive for EPM. There were other things going on too, he would duck his head way down when I rode him the last time at a walk indicating back pain I was told. Then went out to feed a few days later and he was down, I thought he colicing but when I got him up he acted drunk and was stumbling when I led him. Hope your boy gets better soon!
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Old 06-28-2008, 06:45 PM   #7
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If his trapezius muscle is damaged it will affect movement in the leg. This can happen with continuous use of badly fitting saddles, rolling on something or a fall. If someone else has been riding him it may be difficult to get to the bottom of this as no one will want to be responsible to vet bills that may be incurred.
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Old 06-28-2008, 06:53 PM   #8
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well it sounds like it may be neurological-but whatever it is I think it sounds like an after hours Vet call is in order.
If it is some type of encephalitis then recovery depends on the speed in which the drug therapy is started.
If it is not-I would satill want the Vet to see him asap...if he were mine.
Do update us please when he is seen please.
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Old 06-28-2008, 07:09 PM   #9
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A few years ago I had a 20++ Arabian gelding. He would do the same as you are saying. I retired him from riding. He was a flea bitten grey with skin tumors really bad. I think that is what caused mine to do it, having tumors on his head, causing pressure on his brain or something. I eventually had to put him down because of the tumors.

I hope you find out whats wrong, the vet would be your best bet.
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Old 06-28-2008, 07:40 PM   #10
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They can also walk that way if they are very sore in the hind end on both hinds, and are trying to support too much weight on the fronts.

I would talk to a vet and ask if you ca give the horse Bute or some other anti inflamatory and see if that helps.

Karen
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Old 06-28-2008, 08:20 PM   #11
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sounds like he could possibly have wobblers syndrome.

I would have a vet out to check.

He might also just be out of line and need a chiropractor out to do a few adjustments
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Old 06-28-2008, 08:28 PM   #12
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I would explore the possiblity of something neurological? systemic?
If that's not it, maybe a chiro adjustment and/or massage....damaged muscles can mimic a lot of issues...
First, Vet...then see what you have f/there!
Good Luck, I'll send positive thoughts for you!
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Old 06-29-2008, 02:01 PM   #13
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Spent time with Kol today - no apparent pain issues and is walking normally as well. It's bizarre so we will have to get him checked out and call the chiro too. The only time I've ever seen anything like that is when our old mare had been sedated and she was 'trying' to walk it off. But that was explainable.
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Old 06-29-2008, 02:40 PM   #14
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with you saying it doesn't show up all the time makes me think even more that it could be a mild case of wobblers as it doesn't effect them 24/7
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Old 06-29-2008, 03:56 PM   #15
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Doesn't wobblers usually display early in life? Kol is 20 so I hadn't given it much thought about it as a possiblity.
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Old 06-29-2008, 05:55 PM   #16
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wobblers syndrome can be seen in all horses, regardless of age, breed, or gender, but seems to most often crop up in male horses of fast growing breeds, like the thoroughbred and quarter horse.

Typically it does show up when the horse is younger and still growing and often around the age when training begins but it has no real age limit and can show up in older horses. Generally when it affects older horses its due to arthritis.
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Old 06-29-2008, 06:12 PM   #17
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Hmm, well I definitely learned something. Thanks breburtch
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