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Old 04-03-2012, 06:24 PM  
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How to stop a horse from pulling in the lunge line

How do you stop a horse from pulling on the lunge line? And how do you stop them from trying to drag you?
My boss wants me to lunge her young horse with side reins twice a week, and he is a pain in the a** on the lunge line. He pulls a lot, even without side reins. Also when he gets to a certain point in the arena he tries to bolt, ugh. This horse is such a pain to lunge, he is perfect otherwise.
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Old 04-03-2012, 06:44 PM  
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A stud chain can help. When lunging the minute they pull on the line the chain tightens. But it releases pressure immediately when the horse responds.
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Old 04-04-2012, 04:51 AM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bolbi View Post
A stud chain can help. When lunging the minute they pull on the line the chain tightens. But it releases pressure immediately when the horse responds.
Could you put one on over the bridle? He is lunged with side reins so I have no idea how I would be able to work with that...
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Old 04-04-2012, 09:38 AM  
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Keep ahalter on under the bridle, and run the stud shank under the chin, and clip to opposite cheek ring of halter. Reverse direction of the chain hook up as you change directions with the horse
Make sure the chain shank is long enough that it immediately releases when the horse gives. When he pulls, do not just pull back with a steady counter pull, but instead, give him one quick reminder, and then expect him to lunge with slack in the line
A horse should respect that lunge line just like a halter lead line, where he is giving to the pressure of that lead shank by keeping slack in the line, instead of hanging on the end of that shank like he needs to be towed.
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Old 04-04-2012, 05:59 PM  
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Rope halter under the bridle would help also.
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Old 04-05-2012, 01:25 PM  
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Ask the owner what to do. Maybe even watch them longe the horse and see how they deal with it, and how they lunge in general.

I would be seriously pissed of someone put a stud chain on my horse when it also had side reins on. Easy way to make a horse feel trapped and flip out. I would be more likely to wrap the chain over the halter noseband, but regardless I would not use a chain without asking your boss first.

The most productive solution would be to double longe the horse (using two lines kind of like ground driving), but this is a skill that should be practiced on a quiet/trained horse, and again, should only be done with permission.

You could also use jumps/obstacles to close off the area he tends to want to bolt out of.

A proper lunging cavesson would also give you more control and be more productive than a chain.

You may also find that changing directions more often, or spiralling up and down the arena helps. Longing is brutal on young joints, and the horse may just be voicing his frustration/discomfort by being a jerk. By not making him circle as much repetitively you may difuse his frustration.

As an aside, unlike Smilie, I want a consistant connection when longing. I do not want the horse hanging on the end, but I do want a straight longe line, as that is how I want my reins when I ride, and I don't want the weight of the lunge line bouncing on the bit. Neither is more right, but they reflect different riding styles/training principles. This is why I think it is VERY important that you get the answer from your boss rather from people who may have different training styles.
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Old 04-06-2012, 11:58 AM  
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I agree on getting the advise from the owner, as on how they lunge this horse
I don't use side reins, as I lunge using my western saddle, just check the reins back
I only apply stud shank when the horse offers to try and pull away, and when I'm still lunging off of the halter, as opposed to the inside ring of the snaffle.
I ride both the rein contact, as in HUS, and also while schooling a western horse.
I never want a horse leaning on the bit, in either discipline. By slack, I don't mean a huge drape in that lunge line, with that line flopping around, just no constant pressure by the horse, leaning on that aid
I would also deal with the pulling, before worrying about any head set, thus the horse would be checked back with slack in the reins, just enough so that he can't put his nose on the ground, if I had the stud shank attached running under his chin
The idea of feeling 'trapped' occurs when someone does not understand truly how the chain under the chin works, hooked up correctly. Unlike a chain wrapped around the noseband, there is zero pressure applied by that chain when the horse is giving correctly and not pulling. There is no constant action of that chain, as if it is applied correctly, and is long enough, it releases and is non functional, unless the horse pulls , thus is being resistant
But certainly, the owner should be consulted, as it is not the OP's horse

http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=...ail&FORM=VIRE6

Maybe not the best example, but it does show what I mean by slack in the lunge line

another one

http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=...ail&FORM=VIRE6
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