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Old 10-02-2011, 04:04 PM  
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How to prevent pulling while on the lunge line?

Hello all!!!

We have a round pen at the barn, so I'm always lazy about lunging and I throw Twister in the round pen and let her free lunge around me.

However, the other day, I decided I wanted to teach her to lunge on a line rather than just free lunging. I've never taught a horse to do this.

My question is, she did okay, but she was pulling on the rope alot. Obviously, she is stronger than me and I'm not much interested to get in a tug of war with her!!! Any suggestions on how to teach her not to do this?
Thanks!
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Old 10-03-2011, 06:30 AM  
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I have the same issue as you do, so I will be interested to hear what everyone has to say as well. I also have the problem of my mare going nicely for half a lap and then stopping. When she starts up again she takes off at a run and doesn't turn until she hits the end of the line.
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Old 10-03-2011, 06:41 AM  
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The way I prevent pulling is, to use a bridle without reins (or tie them up) and put the lunge line through the full cheek snaffle and run the lunge up and behind ears then come out the other side of the snaffle. (the O ring part). This way when I lunge it gives them some pole pressure and keeps them from running off.


I can back up and say, If a horse has a tendency to run off the line, or has not had experience with the lunge line, I start at the slower gates first then I move up to the lope/canter. I have even brought them down to a small circle (depending on the horse) and corrected them prior to them being out of control.
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Old 10-03-2011, 06:44 AM  
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Here is a picture of someone starting to attach the lunge to the bit.
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Old 10-03-2011, 07:07 AM  
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When a horse pulls on the lunge it is presenting it's jaw toward you. Use a knotted halter and start out using a light yank. If the horse continues to pull give a harder yank but always start out with the least amount and gradually increase how hard you have to pull. The moment he brings his head back be sure not to pull. Move your hand forward a few inches to release the pressure. He'll stick his nose out again and again start with the least pull. He'll start to figure it out if you are consistant and patient.
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Old 10-03-2011, 07:10 AM  
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If bridled I usually do what jerseygirl is showing you......either remove reins, or twist them a bunch of times, and then run your throatlatch through and hook your throatlatch like normal.......if you do not have your horse bridled then you can use shank, or also you can run your lunge line itself through halter rings, this gives you more leverage, without the chain.......
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Old 10-03-2011, 07:14 AM  
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C&R - when she stops, start out with the softest request to move forward. Drop your whip and raise your arm at about 45* to your body so it's pointing behind her hip. If she doesn't move, cluck to see if that helps. If she takes only one step without bolting off, reward her with a rub on her forehead, then try again. You need to get this down pat at the walk before asking for the trot. If there is a particular spot she seems to stop at try using your arm and clucking before she gets there.
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Old 10-03-2011, 09:55 AM  
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If I lunge off of the bit, the horse has to be one that is up on giving to the bit correctly
I don't believe in hanging on that bit for control-good way to ruin a mouth!
I don't do the English method, like Jersey, by running one rein over, but just attach the lunge line to the inside o ring of the snaffle, and the horse is checked back with both reins in the position where he has to give his face correctly in order to have that rein release.
I check the inside rein back slightly more than the outside one, to prevent a main flaw of lunging-the horse learning to drop that inside shoulder and pop hip out of lead
I reverse my setup with direction
Ahabarabs,
Jersey is lunging off of the bit
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Old 10-03-2011, 05:36 PM  
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The whole point of longeing a horse is to improve his balance and you do that by controlling his body position. If your horse is pulling on the line that means his head is turned away from you and he is falling in on the circle. Your first instinct may be to tug on the line. DON"T DO THAT! You will only bring his head in for a second or two and then it goes right back out. You are just fixing a symptom, not addressing the real problem. You should, instead give the horse more line by kind of tossing it towards him (but never really letting go of the line) to create a wider curving path. With every circle, find his weak spots where he falls in and work to improve his position before he gets there.

If you have the opposite problem, and the horse falls out on the circle, get him moving forward to improve his balance. A horse falls out on the circle when his head is too far inside which shifts his legs outside. You will feel the horse pull on the longe line when this happens. You can get him going forward by opening your longeing arm and give verbal cues or use a whip. Also, be aware of your body position. You want to stay parallel with the horse, otherwise you may be inadvertantly "making' him fall out if you step towards him.

Last edited by Ghoti : 10-03-2011 at 05:39 PM.
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Old 10-04-2011, 09:37 AM  
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Originally Posted by Smilie View Post
Ahabarabs,
Jersey is lunging off of the bit
Yes, the way she is doing it is the way I do.....assuming I have the horse bridled/bitted, in her pic. she has not finished where line goes....if she continued then it runs up over the poll, and then down the off side, and snaps to the bit......it's a pretty common method with a lot of dressage/english/etc.

I use it as it applies even pressure, and helps teach to give/bend to the bit, and prevents pulling from just one side of bit......which only really becomes important when introducing side reins/side check......with my english training they spend a long time in the lunging/long lining phase, and spend lots of time schooling/training this way.....
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Old 10-04-2011, 10:12 AM  
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Yes, I realize it is a way English disciplines lunge a horse, and certainly whatever works for your discipline is fine, as I know you have a solid training program
I would think the pul on the outside rein would be contrary to the direct rein signal you have at that stage of a horse;s training, plus I leave poll pressure until the horse is up in a curb, where sight curb pressure applies
When lunging off of the inside snaffle ring, correctly, they is no constant pull, as the horse has learn to leave slack in the lunge line while being lunged at the halter stage first
The bridle reins are used to check the head, tied back to the saddle,(advantage of long split reins) position depending on how that horse carries his head naturally, much like determined when using a circingle.
The inside rein is tied slight shorter, to keep the horse from dropping that inside shoulder
Many western trainers will also use long driving reins to lunge
Not saying one way is better than another, just why for my discipline, I don't use that English method of lunging off of a bridle
I also don't have a cavasson or dropped nose band on my horse, as the western goal is to have that horse work with a relaxed closed mouth, without any artificial means to produce that, as I can't show in a cavasson
The horse learns to keep topline at all gaits and transitions, rewarding himself instantly when he frames up correctly. There should never be any steady pull on that outside snaffle ring-if there is,the horse is not ready to be lunged off of a bridle. Except maybe for a quick pull and release, when needed, there should be no pressure on that outside snaffle ring, with slack in the lunge line.
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Last edited by Smilie : 10-04-2011 at 10:20 AM.
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Old 10-04-2011, 01:42 PM  
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Really it's not too bad, the through bit/over poll, it only takes once, or twice, and then they quickly realize that staying soft is easiest, and then you've got slack in line, or at the least soft contact.....and then we use cavesons too, their wildly accepted in the show ring too.....I think the reason for the main difference in english/western is the fact that the english ( at least arab english ) you have a high degree of collection, and it's contact with the bit collection....it's still achieved by driving with leg/seat from the backend, and getting the weight to the backend.....to further elevate/push the front end up/out....and even if/when rider looks like they have a strong hold on their mouth....their really quite soft in the hands....just being "held" in place, by the hands.....I know even the bigger Arab trainers do things the "right" way ( back to front collection ) but I know that saddlebred ppl.....ride/train front to back, not sure about the morgan, and walker ppl tho....
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Old 10-06-2011, 10:45 PM  
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We use a Bosal to teach our Western horses to lunge and a few of our hard headed English horses. I don't like a horse leaning on the lunge line or bridle so by soing this they learn not to pull. I am small and don't like to be dragged around. When the horse goes to take off I give them alittle slack and then pop the bosal. They will usaually only try it a few times before they start listening. I use a tiedown and rope reins tied to the saddle loosley or surcyngle, to keep the head and neck in position. I keep the whip or rope at the hip to keep them moving forward. Alittle different twist to the problem.
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Old 10-07-2011, 09:31 AM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ahabarabs View Post
Really it's not too bad, the through bit/over poll, it only takes once, or twice, and then they quickly realize that staying soft is easiest, and then you've got slack in line, or at the least soft contact.....and then we use cavesons too, their wildly accepted in the show ring too.....I think the reason for the main difference in english/western is the fact that the english ( at least arab english ) you have a high degree of collection, and it's contact with the bit collection....it's still achieved by driving with leg/seat from the backend, and getting the weight to the backend.....to further elevate/push the front end up/out....and even if/when rider looks like they have a strong hold on their mouth....their really quite soft in the hands....just being "held" in place, by the hands.....I know even the bigger Arab trainers do things the "right" way ( back to front collection ) but I know that saddlebred ppl.....ride/train front to back, not sure about the morgan, and walker ppl tho....
Yes, I agree there certainly is a different way we want stock horses to go, versus Other breeds.
I do consider stock horse western pl the standard, as those horses are 'western breeds', and their standard is also the top level of western pl compitition-NSBA. Therefore we do want the horse able to collect, rate speed and maintain topline soly off of seat and legs, and, as mentioned in western classes, cavassons are not legal
The point where horses need that bit support early in their training, in order to help keep collection and frame, is gone a step beyond, where a finished western pl horse is expected to be able to maintain that collection and frame without being 'babysat with reins"
HUS stock horse classes get critized, as even then we do not have strong bit contact, and sometimes even some slack in the reins, which I know goes against open English standards. Slightly ahead of the verticle is accepted-you get 'killed' for any degree of the horse being behind the verticle-something I often see not penalized in Morgan and Arabians, and probably accounts for the difference in how we start these horses
Therefore, everyone has to train in a way that produces a horse able to be competitive in a venue they want to show that horse at, and also why we lounge/train our horses with some degree of difference, even when we agree on basic horse training /riding principles!
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Last edited by Smilie : 10-07-2011 at 09:37 AM.
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Old 10-15-2011, 09:16 AM  
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The way I prevent pulling is, to use a bridle without reins (or tie them up) and put the lunge line through the full cheek snaffle and run the lunge up and behind ears then come out the other side of the snaffle. (the O ring part). This way when I lunge it gives them some pole pressure and keeps them from running off.


I can back up and say, If a horse has a tendency to run off the line, or has not had experience with the lunge line, I start at the slower gates first then I move up to the lope/canter. I have even brought them down to a small circle (depending on the horse) and corrected them prior to them being out of control.

I second the lunging with the bridle and through the snaffle up over the poll and snap it on the other side of the bit.

My haflinger would put her head down and RUN, dragging me with her behind, once she decided to go that was it. I lunged her with my dad and the stable owner and me on the other end of the line and she still pulled us all down! Then I tried the above and cut my ring in half (with standards and poles or rope) so she could not run very far anywhere. Maybe try lunging in your round pen with the line not free lunging, then half the normal ring size then make it the full ring once you have that down.
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Old 10-15-2011, 02:43 PM  
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my yearling used to pull a lot (now remember i said yearling so the most he does is a walk and a few circles of trots i never let him canter since hes still learning) he does great at a walk but is always on a short line since he prefers to walk closer and trot further. he used to pull a lot until i just kept at it with him with a rope halter and his regular one and he now understands to turn on his own with slight pressure IF he is being cooperative that day lol sometimes he puts up a fight becuse he doesnt want to. and he has issuses at the trot that have to be fixed but my point of posting was to tell you that if you keep at it and try a rop halter for a while at awalk she will start to figure out what you want. she just might not be used to it yet give her a little time.

also what you could do is roundpen her WITH a lunge rope. she seems to understand the roundpen so take her in there with the rope and when she gets to the side she already knows to turn... now if you have a rather large roundpen get your walking boots on lol cause you might have to do a little walking in circles if the pen is big. but aftert that gradually pull her closer to the middle so she lunges off the rope and not that wall. it takes a bit of time but shell get it!
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