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Old 05-25-2008, 09:22 PM  
Val
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Saddle moves when mounting/dismounting

Hi I need advice,

I ride in a Tucker endurance saddle with english rigging. My pad is a toklat wool pad. My girth is a mohair english girth. My horse does not have high withers. Everytime I go to get off my horse, the saddle goes with me and then I am panicking because the saddle is now on his side! Then I am QUICKLY un fastening and placing the saddle back on his back. Not Safe!!!!! I dont know if I need a new pad or a new girth or what???? Please Help! PS: I know you may be thinking my cinch is not tight enough, but that really is not the issue. Any tighter and Im going to cut my horse in half.
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Old 05-25-2008, 09:55 PM  
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How do you dismount? I was taught to take both feet out of the stirrups and then swing my right leg over the saddle and then push off the saddle and the horse to vault cleanly to the ground.

I have moved a saddle or two getting on, but not much, as the first movement balances me accross the saddle, and the second swings my leg over. This works even mounting tall horses from the ground.

Since you say your horse has low withers, how about changing the type of girth you are using? I like the neoprene waffle padded ones. How about using a breast collar as well?
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Old 05-25-2008, 11:14 PM  
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does the saddle fit properly? Are you sure the girth is tight enough? I've only had saddles slide when the girth was too loose. Also, aren't there saddle pads out there with slightly tacky bottoms? Maybe your horse is extra slippery
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Old 05-25-2008, 11:16 PM  
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Hm...

maybe it's the cinch. I have always liked the neoprene breathable cinches because my horse is a sweaty beast after walking for 5 minutes, and it kept my saddle up on my mutton withered mare.
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Old 05-26-2008, 01:14 AM  
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Mine does the same thing and I couldn't figure it out either until I started watching other people mount. Now, I am a beginner, so my skills aren't very good so this could just be me so don't take offense. I noticed that when experienced people mount, they use their legs to jump or push themselves into the saddle. As a newbie, I was trying to step into the saddle and then use my arms to pull myself up, thus pulling the saddle off the horse. So in other words, I was putting all my weight in one stirrup, pulling on the horn and cantle and before I knew it, the saddle was sideways. I am still working on getting some leg muscles and have to use a mounting block so this doesn't happen.
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Old 05-26-2008, 01:27 AM  
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I agree with sherriawright maybe its how you are mounting, tell us how you get on your horse.

BTW I was told never to grab the back of the saddle because it would make the saddle slide...so I grab the horn(or pumal (sp?)) and some mane and hop a bit and then use my legs to get on. vbmenu_register("postmenu_1240886", true);
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Old 05-26-2008, 01:29 AM  
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Maybe you could try (like others are saying) a neoprene girth.....I use the smart cinch neoprene girth....but make sure the girth is large enough to make more contact with horses body....a short girth 27" on a large framed horse has less "grip" on the horses body than say a 32 or 36 inch one would??

AND grab the mane of the horse instead of the saddle when you mount....
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Old 05-26-2008, 08:46 AM  
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I'd stay with the mohair string girth. It sounds like you need to practise mounting. And you are correct about pushing off with the ground leg. You can strengthen your legs by walking alternate steps when climbing stairs. I watched an ex military trained horseman mount a horse with the girth undone and the saddle stayed put.
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Old 05-26-2008, 08:59 AM  
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I have the same problem with my mare. I rarely use my endurance saddle anymore for that very reason. I can't tighten it up enough from the ground...and need someone around to tighten it for me once I'm in the saddle...and then on the trail I'm afraid to get down, lest it start slipping again. I also have an Aussie saddle, with a horn, with which I have the same darn problem.

The only saddles that seem to not slip are my big western ones. I have tried all sorts of girths and all sorts of pads.

With the western saddles I use a very thick pad and a cotton english pad underneath. With the endurance and aussie saddles I've used a blanket and/or an english pad. GEESH.

I'm not as spry as I used to be and can't just vault up or down.

Let me know if you find somethng that works!
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Old 05-26-2008, 09:19 AM  
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Ha! MOUNTING block.
Best for any horse..studies prove it.
Tacky Too liners do help on the grippiness factor.
Equus magazine did a study years ago with a saddle pad with sensors all over it measuring the torque in the horses back when being mounted.
It was significant even with 100 pound riders.
Not being a 100 pound rider-it really made me think.
It takes it's toll on those structures.
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Old 05-26-2008, 11:13 AM  
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Get off like I do...it really helps.

1. Kick out of right stirrup.
2. Sling leg over horse's fanny, making sure you don't bump him.
3. Grasp mane in right hand, loose reins in left.
4. Lean a bit on horse's neck.
5. Kick out of left stirrup.
6. Slide down horse's neck/foreleg.
7. Let go of mane, and hold onto reins.

Voila, you're on the ground, with no extra weight on the left stirrup to slide it around.

As for mounting, I climb the fence, which puts me approximately at the same height as I am when I'm mounted. Slide left foot in, shift weight over saddle, and swing right leg over. Make sure reins are in left hand, and mane is in the right, and you should find yourself easily astride. Now, I know most people don't have fences they can climb, but the same principle goes for the mounting block. The idea is to transfer weight cleanly to the saddle, with as little pressure on the stirrup as possible, without jarring the horse's back.

Good luck, and I know how it is...

BTW, Bklyn, I have the same problem with my Aussie...although Tango is highwithered, it still slides a bit. Which is why I've learned how to get onto him without much pressure from the stirrup, using the fence or mounting block. It isn't actually the tightness of the girth, although we think it is...rather, it's the pressure on the left stirrup.

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Old 05-26-2008, 11:22 AM  
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I like mounting blocks, as tmom said way easier on the horse and you as well.

Does your horse have much for withers, my gelding doesn't have any he is not fat or anything just doesn't have any( mutten withered). These horse are hard to keep a saddle from slipping around on. I used to use a wonpad, they are great. http://www.wonpad.com/
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Old 05-26-2008, 11:27 AM  
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Loose girth is the problem check it right before you get on he/she is puffing its tummy out when your putting the saddle on.
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Old 05-26-2008, 12:16 PM  
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Some horses you can cinch up till you are cutting them in half and the saddle will still slide.
It is mainly the conformation of the horses that can make it a real issue.
Still prefer mounting blocks
I carry my little Black and Decker tool caddy[it has 4 legs] everywhere and that 13 inch tall thing makes all the difference..as well as holding my set of brushes and fly spray etc.
HIGHLY recommend it.
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Old 05-26-2008, 12:20 PM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoniMe View Post
Get off like I do...it really helps.

1. Kick out of right stirrup.
2. Sling leg over horse's fanny, making sure you don't bump him.
3. Grasp mane in right hand, loose reins in left.
4. Lean a bit on horse's neck.
5. Kick out of left stirrup.
6. Slide down horse's neck/foreleg.
7. Let go of mane, and hold onto reins.

Voila, you're on the ground, with no extra weight on the left stirrup to slide it around.

As for mounting, I climb the fence, which puts me approximately at the same height as I am when I'm mounted. Slide left foot in, shift weight over saddle, and swing right leg over. Make sure reins are in left hand, and mane is in the right, and you should find yourself easily astride. Now, I know most people don't have fences they can climb, but the same principle goes for the mounting block. The idea is to transfer weight cleanly to the saddle, with as little pressure on the stirrup as possible, without jarring the horse's back.

Good luck, and I know how it is...

BTW, Bklyn, I have the same problem with my Aussie...although Tango is highwithered, it still slides a bit. Which is why I've learned how to get onto him without much pressure from the stirrup, using the fence or mounting block. It isn't actually the tightness of the girth, although we think it is...rather, it's the pressure on the left stirrup.

Best-
Noni
It's not the dismount that's the problem...and when I first mount I do use a mounting block. It's the re-mounting on the trail that's the problem. Once she's sweaty...it's near impossible to get back on without saddle slippage.

Toveromom...I'm going to look into that little tool carrier thingie. Does it fit into saddle bags easily???
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Old 05-26-2008, 12:37 PM  
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Val, I also have the Tucker Endurance saddle, equitation (english style) model...with english 3 billet girthing. I use a 26 inch leather shaped english girth with elastic in 1 end. My horse is 14.3 and I'm five feet....so a mounting block is a must, and on the trail we look for tree stumps, stones etc. But I find that mounting is fine with the girth snug, once I ride for 5 minutes or so I do need to tighten up the girth one hole, but with the elastic it offers some "give" and if/when she blows herself up at first it's snug, but is still OK when she moves off...but I always need to tighten up 1 hole after we warm up...
I use an Equipedic saddle pad that fits the saddle well, allows lots of room over the withers, and shapes to her back, keeping that area cool and dry....
Good luck with that...and happy trails..
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Old 05-26-2008, 03:43 PM  
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No it does not fit into anything-it is about 14 inches high by 18 inches long and 12 inches wide and looks like a footstool.
I find many things to get on from the trails-boulders,pick up trucks,stand the horse in a hole..etc etc..
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Old 05-26-2008, 05:22 PM  
Val
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Thanks everyone for the great advice! I do use a mounting block to get on. It's when I am out trail riding and need to get off then back on I have issues with. I have to look for a rock, stump, or ditch. It's embarressing in front of the younger, skinnier, more flexible gals I ride with. They dont have any issues getting on/off. They just watch me and you can tell what there thinking I could pull myself up if it weren't for my saddle moving. I do know one thing after reading your guys posts, and that is .....that I am not dismounting properly. I will definately practice that. Hopefully that will help my situation.
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Old 05-26-2008, 08:35 PM  
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How about those little portable step stools with the cord on them? Made specifically for mounting on the trail. Someone on HT mentioned them and I think they said that they work really well. Cost might be about $20?
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Old 06-09-2008, 03:34 PM  
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I know this thread is old, but I found a way to "practice" mounting my horse! Using a mounting block is fine, but I actually got stuck out on a trail ride cause I couldn't get back on my horse!! Never going to happen again! So here is what I've been doing and it's working!

I purchased a 4ft A ladder and have it set up in my living room. I practice mounting it! I started off by doing what I normally and the ladder tipped! I kept practicing until now I can stop on the second step with one hand on the top and throw myself over it. Next I will work on the last step, but that's going to take a LOT of work!

I am only 5'2, so this should work for anyone. I do NOT put a saddle on it.
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