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Old 03-28-2010, 10:24 AM  
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correctional bit

Howdy All!

I am trying to educate myself about correctional bits. The horse in question uses one with medium shanks. He was started in a snaffle but was moved into a bit similiar to what I normally use (shanked 3 piece with roller in the middle) but then he was moved into a correctional which is where he is now. I am wanting to understand the correctional bit better - how it works and when one would use it. This horse is very broke and rides well in it.
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Old 03-28-2010, 12:25 PM  
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How it works depends somewhat on the horses mouth, and the shanks being used.

In general though, it is a bit that puts a lot of pressure on the palate and the bars.

You pull on the reins, the tongue gets folded into the port allowing the sides to drop onto the bars, and pushing the port into the roof of the mouth.

Pressure in these very sensitive areas usually result in the horse contracting its neck and tucking its nose. You may use it on a horse that is well trained, but that needs to learn to tuck its nose. The fact that it is jointed allows for some rein specific pressure on the bars.

Usually it is not weighted, so doesn't self correct like some of the spade type bits, so is a little more friendly for a horse that isn't fit enough to stay tucked all the time.

Karen
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Old 03-28-2010, 12:30 PM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EquineAlberta View Post
How it works depends somewhat on the horses mouth, and the shanks being used.

In general though, it is a bit that puts a lot of pressure on the palate and the bars.

You pull on the reins, the tongue gets folded into the port allowing the sides to drop onto the bars, and pushing the port into the roof of the mouth.

Pressure in these very sensitive areas usually result in the horse contracting its neck and tucking its nose. You may use it on a horse that is well trained, but that needs to learn to tuck its nose. The fact that it is jointed allows for some rein specific pressure on the bars.

Usually it is not weighted, so doesn't self correct like some of the spade type bits, so is a little more friendly for a horse that isn't fit enough to stay tucked all the time.

Karen
Thanks for the great (as usual!) information Karen. I guess that brings my next question. The rider of the horse in question says that she insists that her horse stays "collected and nose tucked in". She also says the bit gives her more control. Is it possible that this is why she is using this bit then? Do I want my horse to be "tucked in" all of the time when I am just riding for pleasure and through trail obstacles??? Is there another bit that might accomplish the control needed since he ignores the snaffle?
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Old 03-28-2010, 01:44 PM  
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the bit would definately give her more control, but it is control through pressure on very sensitive parts of the horse's mouth (so control through potential for pain)

A horse with its head tucked as limited range of vision, so I would not want to force a tuck when trail riding!

A false frame, where the horse sucks its neck in to tuck its nose, is really only usesful to look pretty and/or to limit its vision/ability to disobey. A true frame where the horse's longissimus muscle is being stretched will help strengthen the horse's back and is healthy for the horse, but a nice long and low frame is also good for that.

You can usually tell the difference between a good frame and a false one is to video the horse jogging and loping, and see if the gaits are pure (two and three beat, with a moment of suspension). A horse that is sucked in, such as Rolkur in dressage, will have a disrupted gait.

Either way, I think a horse should be warmed up and cooled down in a relaxed frame, and I think that a horse should be allowed to be a bit of a tourist when pleasure riding and be allowed to take in the sights to an extent, so it doesn't get sour. What YOU think though, is up to you!

Hard to offer an idea for a bit without knowing more about your horse's build and issues. I try to bit for comfort and function. I find horses tend to be softer and more accepting of commands if they are comfortable in the bit and understand the pressure.

Karen
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Old 03-28-2010, 02:37 PM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EquineAlberta View Post
the bit would definately give her more control, but it is control through pressure on very sensitive parts of the horse's mouth (so control through potential for pain)

A horse with its head tucked as limited range of vision, so I would not want to force a tuck when trail riding!

A false frame, where the horse sucks its neck in to tuck its nose, is really only usesful to look pretty and/or to limit its vision/ability to disobey. A true frame where the horse's longissimus muscle is being stretched will help strengthen the horse's back and is healthy for the horse, but a nice long and low frame is also good for that.

You can usually tell the difference between a good frame and a false one is to video the horse jogging and loping, and see if the gaits are pure (two and three beat, with a moment of suspension). A horse that is sucked in, such as Rolkur in dressage, will have a disrupted gait.

Either way, I think a horse should be warmed up and cooled down in a relaxed frame, and I think that a horse should be allowed to be a bit of a tourist when pleasure riding and be allowed to take in the sights to an extent, so it doesn't get sour. What YOU think though, is up to you!

Hard to offer an idea for a bit without knowing more about your horse's build and issues. I try to bit for comfort and function. I find horses tend to be softer and more accepting of commands if they are comfortable in the bit and understand the pressure.

Karen
Thanks Karen - you gave me a lot to think about! I have ridden this horse once with a correctional supplied by the owner, keeping very light contact and he did fine, in an indoor arena. My inexperienced son rode him that same day and he did great for him - they looked great together. I think I would like to see how he does in the bit I described that I usually use...I'll keep you posted as this progresses
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Old 03-28-2010, 03:50 PM  
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I really agree with Karen.

I ride in a correctional when I am showing.. it looks like this
http://www.dmproducts.net/ITnkcor.html


I use mine for my horses shoulders, and although we are schooling to prevent him dropping his shoulder, he still drops on me mainly when I ask for a stop (especially at the lope). I have the long and low headset I want, and I do not need a that bit to bring his hocks underneath him, I use this bit for showing only in which you need that "edge" and preciseness along with the obvious being judged.

I would consider my bit to be very harsh..
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Old 03-28-2010, 09:42 PM  
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Scribbles, a bit can't lift the shoulders unless it is on a pulley to the ceiling. A bit can lighten the jaw, or encourage the poll to tip forward, but to lighten the shoulders you have to drive the hips up and under. Don't confuse the sharper response from a stronger bit with a lighter/balanced horse.
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Old 03-29-2010, 09:40 AM  
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I use a correction bit on my horse when I show, and school in it maybe once a week. Because they are intended to be used with minimal contact, the horse NEEDS to learn how to pick the bit up and it in the mouth. I have not had a problem with a horse getting behind the bit or bringing the face behind the vertical BECAUSE of what I stated previously. Below is a pic of my horse being ridden in a correction bit. Correction bits, like any other ported/shanked bits are for broke/finished horses.



Jennifer
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Old 03-29-2010, 11:53 AM  
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i'm sorry EquineAlberta, but this is what I meant with the shoulders, and I have the bit, and it works.. here is the concept.

http://www.dmproducts.net/THELIFTERTHEORY.html

GotaDunQh love the picture..very fancy
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Old 03-29-2010, 12:13 PM  
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The answer to horses training issues are not in the mouth with a "correction" bit. Correctional bits are shortcuts. If the horse is not listening to a snaffle, and you have to go to a bigger bit... the horse is lacking training.

"Tucking the nose" ??? The horse is reacting to pain and trying to relieve it. When the horse tucks its nose, hopefully the rider quits cueing them. So the horse thinks that is the right answer. It has nothing to do with true collection.

Big business in bits because people keep thinking the answer is in the mouth when the answer is really in the feet. I have a wall of bits gathering dust in my tackroom so I am not the pot calling the kettle black. I have been there, done that and invested lots of money in metal.
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Old 03-29-2010, 05:16 PM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharon Danielson View Post
The answer to horses training issues are not in the mouth with a "correction" bit. Correctional bits are shortcuts. If the horse is not listening to a snaffle, and you have to go to a bigger bit... the horse is lacking training.
"Tucking the nose" ??? The horse is reacting to pain and trying to relieve it. When the horse tucks its nose, hopefully the rider quits cueing them. So the horse thinks that is the right answer. It has nothing to do with true collection.

Big business in bits because people keep thinking the answer is in the mouth when the answer is really in the feet. I have a wall of bits gathering dust in my tackroom so I am not the pot calling the kettle black. I have been there, done that and invested lots of money in metal.
???

I have a senior western horse, so he's ridden in a ported bit. Can't show in a snaffle and he doesn't like snaffles anyway. In my case, the choice of bit has nothing to do with lack of training. A correction bit (have you seen pics of one?), is nothing more than a ported bit.

Jennifer
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Old 03-30-2010, 03:07 PM  
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Jennifer.... since you know how to use this type of bit properly and your horse is trained, that is how it is meant to be used.

If you read the post again, the rider may not be as skilled as you are or have the training you and your horse have. She is looking for something to fix a problem.

A finished bridle horses' bit is what people would call very severe. In the hands of a skilled, and knowledgeable rider, the duo are something to behold. It is the finished product of training, and skill.

Your horse does not like a snaffle because he is not used to a snaffle.

Finally, any bit can be severe if used inproperly.

Just my personal opinion...
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Old 03-31-2010, 10:13 AM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharon Danielson View Post
Jennifer.... since you know how to use this type of bit properly and your horse is trained, that is how it is meant to be used.

If you read the post again, the rider may not be as skilled as you are or have the training you and your horse have. She is looking for something to fix a problem.

A finished bridle horses' bit is what people would call very severe. In the hands of a skilled, and knowledgeable rider, the duo are something to behold. It is the finished product of training, and skill.

Your horse does not like a snaffle because he is not used to a snaffle.
Finally, any bit can be severe if used inproperly.

Just my personal opinion...
Once again....??????

Do you know my horse by some chance? He was started and shown for the first four years of his life ina snaffle, so he's pretty much used to them.....he does not prefer them.

Jennifer
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