Horse Forum
Home Forum Home Search Horses for Sale Other ClassifiedsNEW! Post an Ad Help

Go Back   Horsetopia Forum > Horse Advice > Health & Nutrition
Note: Forum logins are completely separate
from your Horsetopia classifieds account or wishlist.
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 05-15-2008, 06:41 PM  
Pasture Pet
 
Carri's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Alpharetta, Georgia
Posts: 14,311
Laryngeal Hemiplegia, or "roaring"

My horse, Opie, was diagnosed with this today. Does anyone have a horse with it? He has been having a lot of breathing problems for the last year, and we finally scoped him today and he has full paralysis of his left side.

This is what it is:
Left recurrent laryngeal hemiplegia is a disease of horses which makes breathing more difficult and therefore impairs performance. During exercise, horses with left recurrent laryngeal hemiplegia make loud breathing noises that are described as "roaring" or "whistling."

To get more air into their lungs during exercise, horses dilate their nostrils, nasopharynx, and larynx. The large decrease in air pressures created in the airways during inhalation would cause the larynx to collapse were it not for the abductor muscle which dilates this structure (the dorsal cricoarytenoid muscle). Contraction of the dorsal cricoarytenoid muscle dilates the larynx by pulling the arytenoid cartilage and vocal cord out of the airstream. In left recurrent laryngeal hemiplegia, the dorsal cricoarytenoid muscle is paralyzed so that the arytenoid cartilage and vocal cord on the affected side collapse into the larynx during inhalation and obstruct the airways. Air flowing over the obstruction is most likely responsible for the inspiratory sound known as "roaring."

Left recurrent laryngeal hemiplegia is most commonly seen in horses between ages two and seven. There appears to be a greater incidence in large breed horses (greater than seventeen hands) and there is some evidence that left recurrent laryngeal hemiplegia may be hereditary. Horses affected with left recurrent laryngeal hemiplegia often exhibit progressively declining performance levels over a period of weeks or months. Some horses cough and others may have changes in their neigh.
Carri is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2008, 06:48 PM  
Greenbroke Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Virginia
Posts: 3,270
I'm really sorry to hear that, Carri. I know nothing about it---I wish you and Opie the best.
__________________


Peace!! I wish the people of the world could get along as well as the animals in my backyard.
crittermom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2008, 06:51 PM  
Yearling Member
 
Quarters N Paints's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Monterey Michigan
Posts: 873
Here is a really good article a friend sent me about this, we were discussing it as she has a horse she uses for lessons that has it.
Hope it sheds some light for you also

Left Recurrent Laryngeal Hemiplegia ("Roaring") Rachele J. Baker






My friend told me that my horse is a "roarer," but my vet says it has laryngeal hemiplegia. Please explain. The term "roarer" may be used to describe a horse that has left recurrent laryngeal hemiplegia. Horses with left recurrent laryngeal hemiplegia often make loud breathing noises (described as "roaring" or "whistling") when they are exercising strenuously. In horses with left recurrent laryngeal hemiplegia, the left recurrent laryngeal nerve dies back and is no longer able to stimulate the muscle that enlarges the opening of the larynx (throat) during intense exercise to allow more air to be taken into the lungs. This muscle (the dorsal cricoarytenoid muscle) enlarges the diameter of the airways during exercise by pulling the arytenoid cartilage and vocal cord away from the midline of the larynx. Without stimulation from the left recurrent laryngeal nerve, the dorsal cricoarytenoid muscle becomes paralyzed. As a result, the arytenoid cartilage and vocal cord on the left side of the larynx collapse and are sucked into the airway during exercise. Air flowing over this obstruction is most likely responsible for the loud breathing noises called "roaring" in horses with left recurrent laryngeal hemiplegia.

Which horses are more likely to be affected with left recurrent laryngeal hemiplegia?
Left recurrent laryngeal hemiplegia is most often observed in horses between ages two and seven after they have begun training. The disease appears to be more common in large breed horses (greater than seventeen hands). There is some evidence that left recurrent laryngeal hemiplegia may be hereditary. Left recurrent laryngeal hemiplegia may also be associated with localized infections, certain toxins, or trauma to the left recurrent laryngeal nerve.

How is left recurrent laryngeal hemiplegia diagnosed?
Horses with left recurrent laryngeal hemiplegia may exhibit some degree of exercise intolerance and will make loud breathing noises described as "roaring" or "whistling" during strenuous exercise. The performance level of an afflicted horse may progressively decline over a period of weeks or months. Some horses may develop a cough or a change in their neigh.

Horses brought to a veterinarian after exhibiting these signs will receive a complete physical examination to rule out other causes of poor performance. When a horse has left recurrent laryngeal hemiplegia, the dorsal cricoarytenoid muscle atrophies (shrinks or wastes). The veterinarian may palpate the larynx to determine if the dorsal cricoarytenoid muscle has atrophied. If the dorsal cricoarytenoid muscle has become paralyzed due to lack of stimulation by the left recurrent laryngeal nerve, then the arytenoid cartilage and vocal cord on the affected side collapse into the larynx during inhalation and obstruct the airways. Endoscopic examination of the larynx during rest enables the veterinarian to see if the arytenoid cartilages are moving synchronously during breathing.

In normal horses, the arytenoid cartilages can be pulled out of the airway during breathing by the dorsal cricoarytenoid muscle. Some horses with left recurrent laryngeal hemiplegia can be endoscopically observed to have collapse of the arytenoid cartilage and vocal cord into the airway while at rest. Horses with clinical signs of laryngeal hemiplegia (such as loud breathing noises during exercise) that have no visible collapse of the arytenoid cartilage into the airway at rest should have their larynx examined by videoendoscopy while exercising strenuously on a treadmill. Horses that have never been on a treadmill will need to be trained to run on the treadmill over a period of several days before the videoendoscopic examination. If the arytenoid cartilage and vocal cord are observed to collapse into the airway during strenuous exercise on a high speed treadmill, then a diagnosis of left recurrent laryngeal hemiplegia is confirmed.

Is there any treatment for left recurrent laryngeal hemiplegia?
There are a number of different surgical treatments for left recurrent laryngeal hemiplegia. The preferred surgical procedure at this time is called prosthetic laryngoplasty ("tie-back"). In prosthetic laryngoplasty, a suture is used to replace the paralyzed dorsal cricoarytenoid muscle and permanently abduct the arytenoid cartilage to a normal resting position. This procedure also abducts the vocal cord. The suture prevents the arytenoid cartilage and vocal cord from collapsing into the airway during strenuous exercise.

Another surgical procedure that can be performed is called ventriculectomy. The laryngeal ventricles are outpouchings of mucosa bounded medially by the arytenoid cartilages and vocal cords. In a ventriculectomy, the ventricle mucosa is removed which causes the ventricle to collapse and the vocal cord to adhere to the wall of the larynx. This increases the diameter of the larynx and may abolish abnormal breathing noises but does not prevent the arytenoid cartilage from collapsing into the airway during strenuous exercise.

This article was prepared by Rachele J. Baker under the direction of the faculty and staff of the Equine Pulmonary Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University. For a more detailed discussion (including illustrations and a video) on this subject, please see the article entitled Left Recurrent Laryngeal Hemiplegia at the Equine Pulmonary Laboratory at Michigan State University.
__________________
http://quarterpaintranch.homestead.c...AINTRANCH.html

RIDE LIKE A PILOT NOT A PASSENGER
Quarters N Paints is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2008, 10:20 PM  
Kid Safe
 
roberts617's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 6,225
I'm sorry Carri. That's tough.

The vet I worked for did tie-back surgeries. There were 2 while I was there, I know the first one was successful and am pretty sure the other one was too. It was right before we moved back to OK, so I didn't get to follow up with that one.
__________________

"The only way to have a friend is to be one."
roberts617 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2008, 07:20 AM  
Pasture Pet
 
ToveroMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Cleveland TX
Posts: 17,059
yes did the Vet discuss the tieback surgery with you.
lots of Tbreds running with that done.
__________________
ToveroMom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2008, 07:21 AM  
Started
 
beezwing's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: louisiana
Posts: 2,691
I don't know a thing about it, but I do know you..I hope Opie knows what an awesome person he has for an owner, and i wish you the best with coming up with the right treatment.

k
__________________


“Preach the gospel at all times, if necessary use words.”
St Francis
beezwing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2008, 07:24 AM  
Pasture Pet
 
gbarmranch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Mayberry
Posts: 32,628
((((((((((HUGS)))))))) Carri.. it can be fixed, but it is not inexpensive surgery.. I am so sorry..
__________________
http://home.earthlink.net/~vpgann Quality Foundation Quarter Horses

If you believe what you like in the Gospel, and reject what you don't like, it is not the Gospel you believe, but yourself." Augustine of Hippo
gbarmranch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2008, 07:32 AM  
Pasture Pet
 
cameo05's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: In my own world
Posts: 12,404
Oh Carri, I am sorry. I know that had to be a pretty bad blow. Like stated it can be corrected, but it is expensive. I hope that everything works out for you and Opie.

I had a mare that roared when she would run, nostrils flared and turned blood red. Almost seemed like she couldn;t breath. She was a very good barrel horse in her day, but after that we didn't run her anymore for compatition.

Every thing will go well for him, he has you as an owner.
__________________
Life is a bed of roses, until you meet up with thorns.
cameo05 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2008, 03:44 PM  
Kid Safe
 
kanoo32's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Florida
Posts: 5,037
We in the racing industry are faced with this problem often. I have had many roarers come through my barn. We perform one of the surgeries here at the farm.

You can try the radical myectomy first. In this procedure they cut the muscle on the side of the throat to collapse the strictures there to help the horse get more air. It is succesful 50% of the time. It is cheaper, running about $350-500 dollars dependomg on your surgeon, 30 day recovery time.

Since your horse is 100% paralyzed allready, that makes him/her a candidate for the tie back, or as is my preference, the tie forward surgery. It runs about $1200 dollars. Again, 30 day recovery.

After these procedures are performed the horse must eat from the ground to keep from choking and will expel water, grain, mucous, etc.....through the nose. They are more susceptible to respiratory ailments.

Since you are not racing this horse, you will probably get some relief by performing one of these procedures. In my experience, racing horses never return to a very good performance level and I myself retire these horses to a new vocation.

I hope this helps, Good luck!
__________________

"Animals are such agreeable friends--they ask no questions, they pass no criticisms..." --George Eliot

In Loving Memory of Spikey...My Best Friend...I Miss You RIP 1988-2009
kanoo32 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2008, 03:52 PM  
Started
 
knpaints's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,237
There was a TWH Stallion that was at our barn that had this..
Im not sure exactly what procedure they did on him..but whatever it was he didnt have a real whinny anymore, but he was fine. His breathing was good..HE DID however sometimes hyperventilate if he got over excited but ONLY in the show ring, so she stopped showing him. but the vet said that he wasnt doing it because of a physical problem it was mental from him roaring in the past.
I do have to say that he had the CUTEST whinny afterwards lol. i loved listening to him
__________________
Kris~
knpaints is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2008, 05:47 PM  
Kid Safe
 
merleliz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Fairburn, Georgia
Posts: 5,048
Oh, Carri, I wish I knew something about this, but I really don't. So no helpful advice, but tons of prayers for Opie and (((((HUGS))))) for you!
merleliz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2008, 06:33 PM  
Long Yearling
 
stormy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Northwest Lower Michigan
Posts: 1,069
I am so sorry Cari
If we all had the magic wand to make it all right with our much loved horses.
__________________


Life is not measured by the breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away.
stormy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2008, 08:01 PM  
Pasture Pet
 
Carri's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Alpharetta, Georgia
Posts: 14,311
The head of surgery at UGA did not think Opie is a good candidate for the surgery, because the flap that they "tie back" is not the main cause of the problem. He does not even make the normal roaring noise, which is why we have struggled for so long with trying to diagnose him. Our vet and the vet at UGA feel like our best bet at this point is to try to control his allergies to keep him more comfortable, and to keep him on light work for the rest of his life. Luckily, I don't do much strenuous with him anyway, so this is not a major lifestyle change for either of us.
They did not mention the option of a radical myectomy, I wonder if they just did not feel like he would be a good candidate? We are going to try to enhance his breathing with Albuterol when he really needs it, and we did allergy testing to see what we can eliminate.
I think I need to build him his own big paddock with a large bubble around it, and an air purifier!! Wait til I suggest that to my hubby!
Carri is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2008, 07:17 AM  
Kid Safe
 
kanoo32's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Florida
Posts: 5,037
So they are then saying t hat he has heaves? Heaves and roaring are at opposite ends of the spectrum. I would send him and have a respiratory workup done using the treadmill. Then you will have a proper diagnosis, instead of them just guessing. He could also be displacing his soft palate.
__________________

"Animals are such agreeable friends--they ask no questions, they pass no criticisms..." --George Eliot

In Loving Memory of Spikey...My Best Friend...I Miss You RIP 1988-2009
kanoo32 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2011, 09:47 PM  
Newborn Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: colorado
Posts: 3
Showing a roaring horse

Ok,
So I know its allowed in the equitation divisions to show a roaring horse but is it allowed in the hunters?? I cant seem to find any info on wether it is or not?

thanks,
Alea1015
alea1015 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2011, 08:20 AM  
Long Yearling
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: West Lafayette, Indiana
Posts: 1,325
I've been around a few, all racing TB's, or OTTB's, I and people around me mostly say their "flapper" is paralyzed....I have seen partial ones that have been operated on, to try to return them to running, but it usually is not totally successful, and if horse can return to running is not ever 100%. I don't think I have known, or heard of any that had total paralyis, and been returned to running.

Since your interest is not racing though, it is different, I've known lots that can go on to pleasure careers, they'll always be loud, and can do lots of light work, I've even seen people do hunter classes with them, over low fences, it's kind of up to whomever is working horse, how much they want to do ( and for humane reasons, since they cannot get full air )
ahabarabs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2011, 10:39 AM  
Pasture Pet
 
Carri's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Alpharetta, Georgia
Posts: 14,311
Quote:
Originally Posted by alea1015 View Post
Ok,
So I know its allowed in the equitation divisions to show a roaring horse but is it allowed in the hunters?? I cant seem to find any info on wether it is or not?

thanks,
Alea1015
I believe it is considered to be an "unsoundness" for hunters, and is not acceptable.
Carri is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2011, 12:00 PM  
Pasture Pet
 
EquineAlberta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 12,485
Depends on how loud it is and if the judge can hear it. It is also up to the judge to decide on if the issue looks like it is impeding the horse's ability to do its job...so a mild roarer will likely be fine showing.
EquineAlberta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2011, 11:20 AM  
Newborn Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: colorado
Posts: 3
ok thanks everyone.....I ask because I found the perfect horse but he roars....I think its mild though cause hes out of shape and when I rode him over a 2'6 course my mom said that he barely did it....so Im going to take him on trial and possibly buy him and have the surgery done sometime in a few months
alea1015 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2011, 11:21 AM  
Newborn Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: colorado
Posts: 3
does anyone know how much it costs for the surgery?
alea1015 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply

  Horsetopia Forum > Horse Advice > Health & Nutrition


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Back from Fox Hollow Trail Ride Pics of """JACK""" DDD Trail Riding 7 05-05-2008 05:35 PM
How Hard To Work Him? Photos added "before" and "after" NoniMe General Horse Advice 26 08-29-2007 08:10 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:07 AM.


Board Powered by vBuletin ® Copyright © 2000 - 2007 Jel Soft

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.2.0