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Old 02-24-2008, 05:14 PM  
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Horse With Poison Ivy

Have any of you ever had a horse get poison ivy?
The new rescue mare started out last week with a few bumps around her muzzle, nothing too drastic but noticeable.
Well from that point she started really rubbing her face and neck on anything and everything, then her butt and her stomach.
She now has serious hair loss and some raw places from scratching.
Now I assume that it is poison ivy, oak or sumac, only because the pasture area she is in has some in it.
My vet said that just like some people, some horses are very sensitive to it and others can lay all in it and eat and not be bothered.
He advised hydro cortisone cream. But it has advanced so rapidly that I have called him to come out and do something more.
Today after washing the affected areas and applying the cream I now have a really nice case of poison ivy on my arm.
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Old 02-24-2008, 05:22 PM  
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Wow .....but no matter what we still love our animals That really sucks....poor girls....just keep rubbing cortisone creams ..it all takes time to clear up....Mine lasted about 3 weeks
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Old 02-24-2008, 07:21 PM  
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I would agree getting him out to do a bit more. Sounds like she is gonna need a shot to help with the itch, and perhaps something daily as well until it clears up. Poor girl.......
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Old 02-26-2008, 09:14 AM  
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Ooooh... that's not fun at all! And now you have it, too I agree, though, you need something systemic, not topical, if it's that acute. I've heard of some horses actually EATING the stuff with no ill effects, although I just can't imagine that, and of others who break out in hives just walking past poison whatever-it-is. Your vet knows what he's talking about. I'd call them and ask for something injectable to take care of the hives. At this stage, it's a big irritation to her - but the real problems can start if the hives appear internally - so I would just keep an eye on it. Sounds like she's just a sensitive girl!
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Old 02-26-2008, 10:11 AM  
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You could try giving her some Benadryl tablets in her feed twice daily. If that doesn't stop the itch then she is going to need an Azium shot, or you could have the vet dispense that in powder form and topdress that on her feed as well. I would try 5-6 Benadryl tabs in her feed for an average size horse.
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Old 02-26-2008, 10:12 AM  
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my horse has had large mouthfuls of the stuff, and had no symptoms. i have also had them wade through poison oak and then be fine...i was completly under the impression that horses didn't have reactions to stuff like that.
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Old 02-26-2008, 10:15 AM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HorseDork View Post
my horse has had large mouthfuls of the stuff, and had no symptoms. i have also had them wade through poison oak and then be fine...i was completly under the impression that horses didn't have reactions to stuff like that.
Me too....my horses get into it, but have never gotten a reaction from it
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Old 02-26-2008, 06:30 PM  
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Found an interesting article is relation to allergic reactions in general. It does mention that indeed Horses can get Poison Ivy.

http://www.thoroughbredtimes.com/hor...reactions.aspx
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Old 02-27-2008, 04:54 AM  
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My horses eat poison ivy and sumac(sumac trees eaten in the winter) with no ill effects. There is only one sure fire way to get rid of the itch, at least for you, I know this from personal experience and have passed this recipe along to many friends.

Callendula flower petals, loads of them, at least a cup, the more the better!
one cup of cleaned/strained with a coffee filter/ bacon grease or vegetable shortening if you don't have any b/g.
Heat grease to HOT in the microwave or stove, whatever is easier for you. When it's hot pour it over the petals. if you have a mini food mill use this or use your blender and blend the mixture for optimal extraction. The mixture should be a bright color of the petals. You can leave the petals in if you wish but straining this mixture through another coffee filter will give you a lovely liquid that hardens when cooled. It is ready to use right away and stops the itch almost immediately and healing begins. This does need to be kept in the freezer but with your horse needing it you can leave it in the fridge. It will take very little time to heal and the big thing is the itch is gone!
My wonderful neighbour gave me this recipe for when my son, bless his playfull heart came home totally covered in poison sumac and I mean totally!
I used this on him and he healed up very quickly and didn't itch. Poor guy, he was so uncomfortable until he put this on every effected spot.
A friend was haying and wound up with poison ivy all over his arms, happened every year! Him and his father both suffered through it. His wife rode at the barn where I worked and I gave her some as she too had some on her fore arm. She put it on and within minutes she forgot she even had it.
I'm trying to enable people like myself and my kids and friends who are allergic to all the poison plants mentioned to have an effective, non cortizone, which never worked for me, approach to rapid itch relief and healing.
It's natural and if you can grow Callendula, do it and always have a supply in the freezer for such occasions.
If you don't know what they are go to your local greenhouse and ask them. Depending where you are they may of may not be blooming right now. If it's winter, check out your local health food store and perhaps they have come Callendula cream. Not sure if this will work as good as this recipe though. We used this for diaper rash.
Anyways, please don't get upset with this post as I am only trying to help us horsey people save some money. This works for me.

Good luck with her.
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Old 02-27-2008, 07:20 AM  
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Dialem, I'm writing that one down and keeping it. Thank you! I don't like the use of steroids (they are often misused), so this is a great alternative. My mom and grandmother would make tea out of the dry seedheads, and said that it was an excellent liver tonic. My mom still has them in the garden. I wholeheartedly believe and understand today's medicine and science (considering what I do for a living, I should...), but there are lots of 'folk' remedies that are very, very effective even though they are not commercially effective to produce. Do you know if it absolutely has to be a solid fat, or if any heat-tolerant liquid vegetable oil can be used? I've heard that almond oil particularly is very, very soothing to skin. All it is, really, is an extration into an oily phase...
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Old 02-27-2008, 07:23 AM  
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Benadryl also has a spray that you can use. That way your not rubbing it in.
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