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Old 11-05-2007, 07:21 PM  
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Signs of a stifled horse?

What are the signs of a "stifled" horse?
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Old 11-05-2007, 07:53 PM  
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Also known as Upward Fixation of the Patella. A typically the hind leg will lock into place. Said to be an abnormality of the stay mechanism of the hind leg, preventing release of patella from the medial condyle of femur when the horses change from rest to movement.

Is this what you are looking for?
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Old 11-05-2007, 08:01 PM  
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So, it would be obvious? Lameness, locking, swelling, pain...the whole bit? Clicking? Obvious?
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Old 11-05-2007, 08:05 PM  
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Or if they actually tore one of the ligaments, the joint would be loose and floppy with no power.

That happens often in pulling horses.
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Old 11-05-2007, 08:08 PM  
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My trainer's old horse had a chronic stifle locking problem but he functioned fine with it (jumping, showing, etc). I don't remember him ever really being lame on it, but there was definitely clicking and it would lock from time to time, but he'd always work out of it. Something wrong with the tendon/ligament connection in his stifle region. If there's swelling and your horse is lame on it, I'd think there's something else going on than just a locking stifle.
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Old 11-05-2007, 08:16 PM  
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No, actually it's the opposite. We were told by a trainer that he was stifled. But, I have a miniature with a terrible locking stifle problem and it's not at ALL like that. My gelding doesn't have any signs of being stifled that I'm aware of. I thought maybe I was misinterpreting and it was a regionality for something else!
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Old 11-05-2007, 08:16 PM  
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Something else to consider since it has similiar symptoms:

Cellulitis in horses
Horses may acquire cellulitis, usually secondary to wound (which can be extremely small and superficial) or to a deep-tissue infection, such as an abscess or infected bone, tendon sheath, or joint. Cellulitis from a superficial wound will usually create less lameness (grade 1-2 out of 5) than that caused by septic arthritis (grade 4-5 lameness). The horse will exhibit inflammatory edema, producing a hot, painful swelling. this swelling differs from stocking up in that the horse will not display symmetrical swelling in 2 or four legs, but only in one leg.

This swelling begins near the source of infection, but will eventually continue downward the leg. In some cases, the swelling will also travel upward. Treatment includes cleaning the wound and caring for it properly, the administration of NSAIDs, such as phenylbutazone, cold hosing, applying a sweat wrap or a poultice, and mild exercise. Veterinarians may also perscribe antibiotics. Recovery is usually quick and the prognosis is very good if the cellulitis is secondary to skin infection.
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Old 11-05-2007, 08:17 PM  
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His leg looks absolutely normal to me! I don't know....
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Old 11-05-2007, 08:21 PM  
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I would think that pain, swelling, locking and lameness could be possible. Some lock as talkofthetown4eva referred to without any of the above instances. A few step backwards can usually release them, or gentle manipulation of the joint. Hooking the stifle muscle, could produce signs as you referred to as well. My big gelding did that once. Also, as Beth referred to, a possible tear of the length of the stifle muscle could produce some of the above.

Do you have one you suspect has injured his/her stifle?

Sorry lots of post before I got this up.

Do you think that her reference may be to a stiffer, shorter stride on that side?
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Old 11-05-2007, 08:21 PM  
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Does he just have a bit of a "hitch" in his movement? Is that what the trainer is saying?
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Old 11-06-2007, 05:48 AM  
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He has nothing that I can see at all. That's why I'm concerned! His conformation would not lend itself to stifle problems, maybe some hock problems further down the line, but not anything like being stifled. The only thing the trainer could say was that he slides a bit in the back. He injected him with Adequan, but I didn't notice a difference, really.

I was just checking to make sure my understanding of being stifled was what everyone else's was!

Perhaps it's a Texas term that has nothing to do with the stifle at all......
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Old 11-06-2007, 06:03 AM  
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My Thoroughbred mare (17yrs old) was seen by a vet because I was worried that she was suffering from upward fixation... He confirmed that there was a slight fixation, but nothing that couldn't be fixed... I noticed it when I would bring her out to take her to her pasture and her left hind leg would almost drag across the ground when she would attempt to lift that leg to place under her... Of course, it was more like a "Catching" as it would unlock and she would be able to move it... The first few steps you could see it popping into place then once she was moving it was fine... When pressure was placed in the stifle area, she showed no pain...

Vet recommended to me that we either A) Blister the stifle, B) Cut the stifle (No gaurenteed recovery) or C) try to work it out of her; as in riding it out of her... It can be ridden out, but only on straight lines and is better to work trotting up hills... We don't have hills in FL, so that was out of the question. I gave her about 4 weeks rest and started riding her on the flat.. I'd trot the long sides of the arena for 10-15 minutes at a time...

The upward fixation can be from numerous things... Lack of condition being the main factor... Scar tissue is also a factor... Blistering the stifle will create scar tissue in the stifle that will prevent the upward fixation, but if it is just due to lack of condition, I'd skip the expense of blistering...

Hope that provided some insight for you
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Old 11-06-2007, 08:07 AM  
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Range, I found your post an eyebrow raiser and went digging. Found some interesting things in regards to Stifled.

I also read where the termed stifled was used to referred to a jammed heel?

I did find this particular article interesting and thought it might lend some insight to your trainers possible view and meaning.
http://www.ridingart.com/balance.htm

My digging did prove the fact that one word can have and relate to a lot of different meanings.
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Old 11-06-2007, 09:49 AM  
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OOOH! OOH! I can answer this one. I have a horse who's stifles get locked and she kicks out only at a canter or gallop. I've recently discovered this and read up on it. She doesn't pop or click, but the last time she slipped into a canter (not by me asking), she had to give 3 good kicks of her left leg to unlock it.

Here's a pic: http://www.amesphotographs.com/-/ame...& searchTerm=
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Old 11-06-2007, 09:56 AM  
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I wonder if this is in my future too because my mares leg clicks when it's picked up. The only time it clicks is if it's picked up though, it doesn't do it when she's walking or any other time. Should I be worried too?
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Old 11-15-2010, 11:52 AM  
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Exclamation trying to find answers about a recent lameness in my stud

Maybe someone can help me solve what's going on with my stud. A few weeks ago we had found my mare out (incindently) with my stud and another gelding. Thankfully noone was cut up in the fence but when we brought everyone in for grain we noticed a medium sized cut over the stifle on the stud. He doesn't seem tender to the now healed scrape but when I Take him out to lunge him he is lame. There is no clicking , dragging of the hind leg or a coming in and out of the joint...just a inevitable gimp. I thought it would get better with time but it has only gotten worse. I would love all or any input. Should I leave him inside to heal or just let him go on as normal? Its almost like he moves the lame leg out and in on a long step, I am obviously miffed.
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