Horse Forum
Home Forum Home Search Horses for Sale Other ClassifiedsNEW! Post an Ad Help

Go Back   Horsetopia Forum > Horse Advice > Health & Nutrition
Note: Forum logins are completely separate
from your Horsetopia classifieds account or wishlist.
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 11-01-2006, 09:19 AM  
Rev
Halter broke
 
Rev's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 196
Milk Weed in Hay

I am not good at knowing which plants are poisonous. There has been some milk weed in the hay that I have been buying. Should I be concerned? I figured the HT crew would know!
Rev is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2006, 09:22 AM  
Weanling Member
 
SCGaiter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Florence, South Carolina
Posts: 218
I am under the impression that milk weed is poisonous. If that is the case, I hope all your horses are fine.
SCGaiter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2006, 09:25 AM  
Rev
Halter broke
 
Rev's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 196
They have been eating the hay and seem fine, and they seem to leave the milf weed, so that is good, I am just not sure about taking the chance if it is poisonous. Thanks
Rev is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2006, 09:46 AM  
Yearling Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: SW FL
Posts: 639
Stupid question here
Why would your feed store sell hay with milkweed in it?

I would take the bales back or call the feed store. or is this hay that you are baling yourself?
__________________
Where there is life there is Hope
tricia3kids is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2006, 09:49 AM  
Yearling Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: SW FL
Posts: 639
plants in North America

check out this list of plants


http://www.whmentors.org/saf/poison.html
__________________
Where there is life there is Hope
tricia3kids is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2006, 09:54 AM  
Kid Safe
 
taelesean's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Virginia
Posts: 6,419
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Pudue School of Veterinary Meicine's website
26. MILKWEEDS

Asclepias spp.

(milkweed family)


TOXICITY RATING: Low to moderate. Milkweeds are unpalatable, and have variable toxicities. Death is not likely unless large quantities are consumed.


ANIMALS AFFECTED: All animals may be affected. Sheep are most at risk, but cattle, goats, horses, poultry, and pets are also at risk.


DANGEROUS PARTS OF PLANT: Stems, leaves, roots.


CLASS OF SIGNS: Gastrointestinal irritation (primarily vomiting and diarrhea), incoordination, tremors, heart problems, respiratory difficulty, death.


PLANT DESCRIPTION: Milkweeds, such as common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca (fig. 26), get their name from the thick, sticky, milky sap that oozes out of cut or torn leaves, stems, and fresh pods. The usually solitary stems of milkweed grow 1 to 5 feet tall and bear opposite (sometimes whorled), sometimes fleshy leaves with entire margins. Flowers emerge in umbrella-like clusters and range in color from pink to rose-purple to orange or white. The fruit (fig. 26A) is a pod with "tufted" seeds. A dozen species of milkweeds grow in Indiana woods and swamps, but most commonly in dry soils of fields and road-

sides. Dogbanes (Apocynum spp.), which are easily confused with milkweeds, are found in the same habitats and may cause similar poisoning.


SIGNS: There are several different types of milkweeds with varying degrees of toxicity, with the whorled milkweeds being the most toxic. Milkweed plants are considered unpalatable and are eaten only when other forages are not available, and may also be found in hay and processed feeds. The primary toxicants are cardiac glycosides that cause gastrointestinal, cardiac and respiratory problems and can cause death if enough is consumed. Resins (especially galitoxin) in the milky sap may also contribute to the toxicity of milkweed. In ruminants, the first signs are incoordination, muscle tremors and spasms, bloat, increased heart rate, breathing problems, and occasionally death. Horses are very reluctant to eat this plant, and its toxicity is only rarely reported: colic, diarrhea, abnormal heart rate and rhythm, rarely death. In animals that are capable of vomiting (pigs, dogs, cats, humans), this is the first sign to develop and is beneficial in that further absorption of the toxin is lessened. Horses cannot vomit, and vomiting is not generally observable in ruminants (if vomiting occurs, the contents still remain in the rumen), therefore toxic signs will be worse in these species.


FIRST AID: There is no antidote if an animal consumes milkweed. It is important to limit further ingestion of the plants or contaminated feed. If the animal recently consumed a large amount of the plant, a veterinarian should be called so that the gastrointestinal tract can be emptied and supportive care provided. Small tastes of the plants tend to result in minor oral irritation, and serve as a deterrent to further consumption, and these little nibbles typically do not require treatment.


SAFETY IN PREPARED FEEDS: Milkweed is toxic both fresh and dried, therefore hay, silage, green chop, and processed feeds that contain milkweed are never safe for consumption.


PREVENTION: Animals will avoid milkweed as long as there is sufficient forage available. Care must be taken to avoid incorporation of milkweed into prepared feeds and hay, and these feeds should be discarded.
I will agree with Tricia3kids, you should get your money back on this hay, or they should exchange it for hay without milkweed.

On the brighter side, I doubt your horses will be poisoned by the hay they have already eaten - milkweed has a nasty taste and it takes alot to cause an animal problems.
__________________

taelesean is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2006, 09:55 AM  
Rev
Halter broke
 
Rev's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 196
I don't know anyone tht buys hay from a feed store around here, it is crazy expensive. I got it from a local farmer. Since I have originally posted this, I have since called my old hay supplier and am going to pick up some hay from her tonight. I am not going to chance the milk weed hay. And the bad thing is that the hay with the milk weed is being sold as "horse hay."
Rev is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2006, 10:06 AM  
Yearling Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: SW FL
Posts: 639
REV...no disrespect meant....I live way out in the country, and go to the local feed store for our hay.

most of the local fields down here are baled for cattle purposes.
__________________
Where there is life there is Hope
tricia3kids is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2006, 10:12 AM  
Started
 
barnmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: northeast pennsylvania
Posts: 2,771
i really didn't know you could buy hay from the feedstore i don't think we can here, we have to find it from local farmers and i have found a lot of random stuff baled up in it, not through the whole load but a weed here, a piece of plastic bag there a feather, but we always open and fluff up the bales for them so anything that looks odd we pick out, the farmer, i'm sure, didn't do it on purpose, but if it was completely milkweed you should get your money back
barnmom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2006, 10:21 AM  
Yearling Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: SW FL
Posts: 639
barnmaid43

Geez I am feeling like a real backwoodser now

We have a local feed store that I go to a purchase everything from feed to hay...its been around for 60plus years. I will add that the hay is the freshest, cleanest...and when I pull in my hay truck to the front gate the horses here act like the candy man just arrived.

It is one of those places that on any given day of the week or weekend(for me) you can go a meet your neighbors. Of course this is particularly good since no one really has a neighbor around here. the nearest place to me is about 4 miles away. we can talk about the events of the week and any animal issues that we might have. someone always offers up some advice.
__________________
Where there is life there is Hope
tricia3kids is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2006, 11:17 AM  
Rev
Halter broke
 
Rev's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 196
Tricia3kids-I wish your feed store was near me! It sounds great! I am way out in the middle of nowhere too, and I wish I knew some of the people near me.
Rev is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2006, 11:42 AM  
Coming two
 
Lopin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 1,754
Many years ago, we had some milkweed come up in our hayfield that got baled along with the hay. The horses just ate around it and as long as they are getting enough hay to eat, they won't touch the milkweed.
__________________


When life gets you down - just put on your big girl panties and deal with it.
Lopin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2006, 12:07 PM  
Yearling Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: SW FL
Posts: 639
Rev...............I suppose this forum is like cyber feed store

I really love the Feed store, when you are there you feel like you are lost in a time warp....and yes there are two guys who sit uder a huge oak tree and play checkers...they have never missed a saturday.
__________________
Where there is life there is Hope
tricia3kids is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2006, 07:40 PM  
Greenbroke Member
 
Seanachie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 3,398
If it's just the occasional stalk or two mixed in with otherwise good quality hay I wouldn't worry too much about it harming the horses. Milk weed is unpalatable to horses so they'll just eat around it.
__________________
Seánachie

"I'll keep my guns, my religion, and my money - you can keep the change."
Seanachie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2006, 07:40 PM  
Long Yearling
 
ilovepaints1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 1,070
I have a few milk weed plants in my hay too. I have to grab the best quality I can get around here with the continous drought the past couple of years I cant afford to be too picky as long as there is no danger to the horses. My horses just eat around it. Sometimes it seems like they can sense the things they are not supposed to eat but then again I have heard about alot of horses that thought it was a good idea to eat a 50lb of corn in one sitting. I wouldnt freak out too much if they are not eating it. I fluff my flakes out to see if there is anything in them that needs to be picked out especially since I found a dead snake in a fresh bale one year.
__________________

"To many, the words love, hope, and dreams are synonymous with horses" - Anonymous
ilovepaints1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2006, 09:01 PM  
Seasoned
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 4,137
Hey moderators! Maybe we should have a sticky in the health section with a list of poisonous plants and their pictures, as a quick reference guide.

I have no idea what half of the plants of Tricia's link are or what they look like...

Good idea, or no?
wildcat180 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2006, 06:03 AM  
Greenbroke Member
 
Seanachie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 3,398
Quote:
Originally Posted by wildcat180
Hey moderators! Maybe we should have a sticky in the health section with a list of poisonous plants and their pictures, as a quick reference guide.

I have no idea what half of the plants of Tricia's link are or what they look like...

Good idea, or no?
That's a smart lady up there!
__________________
Seánachie

"I'll keep my guns, my religion, and my money - you can keep the change."
Seanachie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2006, 06:33 AM  
Rev
Halter broke
 
Rev's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 196
That's a great idea
Thank you everyone! I really appreciate all of the feedback. It is nice to know I can come to HT and ask you guys anything!
Rev is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2006, 06:45 AM  
Yearling Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: SW FL
Posts: 639
toxic plants

Hey Guys...just a side note Remember we all live in different regions....there fore we have different plants. example I live in the tropics and will have more plants year round then most
I never have snow covering my ground, leaves do not change..(example red maple is toxic) but only when the leaves change. How ever I do have tons of ferns and many are very toxic to horses(braken fern being one)

If we have a list posted it needs to be regional I do agree that a photo identify link would be great for all.

life can be so confusing for us humans
__________________
Where there is life there is Hope
tricia3kids is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2006, 07:40 AM  
Kid Safe
 
muttduck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Central Kentucky
Posts: 7,183
Talk about your big requests!!


I'll bring it up to the others to see if we can find a way to make this a bit more convenient.
__________________
www.woodburnedpetportraits.com - Custom wood burned stall plaques, portraits, and farm signs, featuring your equine or pet.
www.buckeyehollowfarm.com- Rex, Dutch Rabbits & Percentage Boer Goats
muttduck is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply

  Horsetopia Forum > Horse Advice > Health & Nutrition


Thread Tools



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:12 AM.


Board Powered by vBuletin ® Copyright © 2000 - 2007 Jel Soft

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.2.0