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Old 05-17-2006, 09:16 AM  
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Sweet Feed

I was just wondering if it is true that sweet feed can make your horse hyper!!! I was told the other day by someone that that a horse on sweet feed is like a kid on sugar. They also said that most horses that are feed sweet feed are horses that are shown??? What do you guys feed your horse.
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Old 05-17-2006, 09:25 AM  
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Very true. Molasses is used to cut down dust and to make it taste better. That is exactly why I feed as little grain as possible. My mares/foals are on sweet feed right now and tell you what two of the three are blithering idiots right now. They are being weaned off of the feed right now as I start the colts on creep feed.
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Old 05-17-2006, 09:26 AM  
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It depends on the percentage and amount of exercise you are doing. We feed all of our mares a 10% sweet feed, and give extra to the stallions during breeding season. We also do the same with any horse in heavy training, or will supplement with senior feed. All of our horses are turned out all of the time though, and the amount of grain they get depends on wether they are in foal, nursing a foal, and how "fat" they are getting. We have two mares that I think can gain weight just inhaling the smell of grain (kinda like me and chocolate or coffffeeee!!!). Too much grain in the heat is also not good for them. But yes, if they aren't being turned out or worked, over graining can create some hyper horses!!!
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Old 05-17-2006, 09:30 AM  
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Well that makes me happy to hear. My trainer was the first person I heard that from and I just like to hear it more than once. I have had a problem with my gelding bucking me everytime I ride!!! He has been so crazy!! The guy that trained him was so confused he said he was a awesome horse that he never bucked when he had him for a month. Then he asked what we feed him and he was like ohhh man their is half your problem!!! Sunday was the first I was able to ride him normal with out any trouble!!! So this must be true!!!!
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Old 05-17-2006, 09:51 AM  
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I think it is personal choice-I just prefer not to feed a sweet feed. nutritionally it adds nothing they actually require and I live in a HOT zone. Molassas can easily 'sour" in the heat.
Carbs are what can hot up a horse. New feeds finally address this issue and there are a lot of new ones out there.
We feed a 12% protein and 8% fat pelleted ration to all of ours. They do well on it and the hi fat means I no longer have to supplement with the rice bran. I feed an alfalfa pellet too[no decent alfalfa sources here] also.

<Edited by Orchid to remove an odd code thing. >
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Old 05-17-2006, 09:51 AM  
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I have no idea why it did that how odd
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Old 05-17-2006, 09:55 AM  
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We show Shetland ponies and Arabs and never feed a sweet feed. One reason is it is not nutritionaly enough for them. Two we NEVER feed anything with corn to our show horses. (it causes thick necks).
But we dont feed sweet feed.
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Old 05-17-2006, 09:55 AM  
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We have switched them to safe choice I have heard it is supposed to be good for their coat hoofs and keeps them from colic!!!!
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Old 05-17-2006, 10:04 AM  
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We have 3 mares and a gelding with one foal on the way (sometime this month) and we feed them all Safe Choice.
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Old 05-17-2006, 10:24 AM  
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Our horses get fed sweet feed that's mixed at our local elevator. I still haven't checked to see what percent it is...

Anyway, our horses don't get very much of it.. just enough to have them come into their stalls every night. That's one of dad's things.

If a horse needs a little more weight, they will get a mix of empower, complete pelleted feed, and beet pulp.

I honestly haven't noticed a huge difference in hotness levels in our horses, even when they were getting omolene (the performance blend), which is sweet feed!
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Old 05-17-2006, 10:44 AM  
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I use a 12% sweet feed for all of my horses. My arab is on it, although not very much and I haven't noticed it making him "hot". I feed it to my in-foal mare and she is shiny, fat and sleek. I also feed it to my newly foaled mare, along with a junior pelleted feed, beet pulp and weight builder.
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Old 05-17-2006, 10:57 AM  
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My colt at the trainers is on Safe Choice with a scoop of empower,beet pulp shreds and is on alfalfa hay.
He is being fit for halter and hi protein was not something I wanted him on. I was glad to see the trainer and I were on the same page before I took him over there.
Too much protein can be as bad as not enough. Too many young horses are destroyed physically with overloading at young ages.
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Old 05-17-2006, 11:03 AM  
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I have fed a high protein 14% high fat feed to my old hard to keep Arabian gelding. I never had hyperness issues out of that. Now my current Arabian is eating Strategy about 1.5-2 lbs twice a day and I'll see what he gets like. I don't feed sweet feed my self. My trainer does and also supplements it with vitamins. Her horses are regularly worked and turned out and don't have any hyperness issues. The country pleasure and costume kids are hotter than the hunters or western kids but that's to be expected.
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Old 05-17-2006, 11:11 AM  
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I was thinking about the few days that I worked at a training facility for reining and western pleasure. All their horses got sweet feed. But, along with the sweet feed they also got a supplement that cost $400! They were all sleek and fit and calm as could be.
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Old 05-17-2006, 11:25 AM  
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Sweet feed will not make all horses HYPER, just as extra sugar will not make all kids hyper.

But, if a horse has borderline thyroid activity or maybe slightly insulin resistant, it can really affect them.

Modern research has shown that high carb foods and foods that are high on glycemic index can be hard on many horses that are in this category and can actually make them more prone to founder.

Horses break down protien into fatty acids in the front gut and absorb them in the hind gut. Their digestive tract is sensitive and there is not a dang thing we can do about that except try to make it easier on them.

The modern feeding programs developed by vets and equine nutritionists lean towards a high fat/low carb diet of variying protien contents dependent upon the age and activity of the horse or foal.

Many feed companies are now offering non-grain based feeds that are lower in carbs. They utilize beet pulp and rice brans to have high fat/low carb feed that is highly palatble for the horse and better for his overall health.

Studies also show that this diet is very good for the hard working horses that have troubles with psm (tying up) and horses that have hypp attacks.

For our horses that have a light or medium work load or pregnant, the 12-8 works great as they hold weight very well and stay slick and shiny with it. Gowing horses and late trimester mares need a little more protein as they are developing musclar and skeletal systems.

In my opinion, the high fat low carb diet is about the most overall healthiest diet for horses and reduces the risk of founder and other problems. Just because our grandfathers and fathers fed sweetfeed and corn is no reason for us not to consider, at least give it a fair chance, a newer diet more suited for todays horses.
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Old 05-17-2006, 12:02 PM  
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My mares get pelleted feed because it stays fresher longer than the sweet feed. Only having two horses, it takes awhile to use up the feed. I also decided to keep them on pellets because I also heard it makes them hyper, and my horses have enough energy as it is!
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Old 05-17-2006, 12:13 PM  
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Our horses are all on Omelene sweet feed, partially because it's the highest quality brand name that is readily available at the nearby feedstores and partially because our vet speaks VERY highly of the nutritional research that went into the formula.

I don't notice it making our horses hot (then again, it is a "lower carb, higher-fat" formulation sweet feed, according to the label). But it does have a tendency to go bad during the hot summer months.

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Old 05-17-2006, 12:18 PM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ron
Sweet feed will not make all horses HYPER, just as extra sugar will not make all kids hyper.

But, if a horse has borderline thyroid activity or maybe slightly insulin resistant, it can really affect them.

Modern research has shown that high carb foods and foods that are high on glycemic index can be hard jon many horses that are in this category and can actually make them more prone to founder.

Horses break down protien into fatty acids in the front gut and absorb them in the hind gut. Their digestive tract is sensitive and there is not a dang thing we can do about that except try to make it easier on them.

The modern feeding programs developed by vets and equine nutritionists lean towards a high fat/low carb diet of variying protien contents dependent upon the age and activity of the horse or foal.

Many feed companies are now offering non-grain based feeds that are lower in carbs. The utilize beet pulp and rice brans to have high fat/low carb feed that is highly palatble for the horse and better for his overall health.

Studies also show that this diet is very good for the hard working horses that have troubles with psm (tying up) and horses that have hypp attacks.

For our horses that have a light or medium work load or pregnant, the 12-8 works great as they hold weight very well and stay slick and shiny with it. Gowing horses and late trimester mares need a little more protein as they are developing musclar and skeletal systems.

In my opinion, the high fat low carb diet is about the most overall healthiest diet for horses and reduces the risk of founder and other problems. Just because our grandfathers and fathers fed sweetfeed and corn is no reason for us not to consider, at least give it a fair chance, a newer diet more suited for todays horses.
Can not say it any better then that!!! We feed all of our horses Nutrena feeds, prefer Safe Choice, some that are boarded get a lesser quality feed but are supplemented with Empower, high in fat. Works great for our Broodmares, growing horses and our Show horses, both Halter and Pleasure horses!
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Old 05-18-2006, 10:53 AM  
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depends on the horse IMHO
My mares, Appy and a Pinto, were fed sweetfeed until I moved to NC, then we moved to pellet which they did just as good on. If it made them "hyper" I never notied a difference in them. My TB was on sweet when I bought him and moved him up from PA. When he began loosing weight I moved him to a pellet feed and he gained weight, but again I did not see a difference in his behavior. Then again, they have all been turned out nearly 24/7 and my mares were riden nearly daily. Not so much with the boy as I am "mom" now
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Old 05-18-2006, 11:06 AM  
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The higher the protein the more energy they have if not worked.

My father worked in feed mills since he was 17 years old and I learned a lot from him.
I have fed sweet feed for ever and the only time I notice a difference is when I fed higher protein feed when they are not worked.
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