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Old 01-03-2006, 10:49 AM  
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Feeding horses corn.

http://64.233.179.104/search?q=cache...hl=en&ie=UTF-8

I spoke to a man this last weekend.
He fed his gelding corn.
The horse had a severe episode of colic.
Two days after the horse returned from the Vet Hospital it was still passing corn.
The above is a comment from John Lyons Bulletin titled
"Small additon about feeding corn."

Comment is on bottom of page.
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Old 01-03-2006, 04:38 PM  
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We see alot of corn feeding around here. These "good ole boys", that is all they will feed their equines. I just want to scream at them but it wouldn't do any good. I got my Belgian cross from a guy who only fed him corn. He wasn't skinny but he just didn't have any gloss to his coat and his eyes were dull. After being fed correctly about a month, his coat is shiny and his eyes are bright. Just an aside, I asked the guy if he had a coggins or if his shots were up to date and his answer was "well I can keep him or I can sell him, doesn't matter to me". So, I bought him as quick as I could and stopped at the vets on the way home.

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Old 01-03-2006, 04:48 PM  
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Barn Kitty says...
Excess protein can also result in more energy as whatever protein the horse cannot initially use is either secreted in the urine or converted to carbohydrates.

Sorry kitty..nope. It is not a magic act..there are 3 types of nutrients fats-proteins and carbohydrates you can fry a carb in oil but it is sstill a carb


Is this the part about corn you were talking about?
Posted by Sandy
Just a small addition about feeding corn. Corn is extremely high in starches, as well as grains. Some up to 40% in starch. Starch causes lactic acid in the hind gut and is never fully digested. This leads to small problems such as being 'mareish' and more severe problems that we believe is training, when in fact it is what we are feeding. The culprit is the high starch levels
************************************************** *******


Well corn is a starchy vegetable. It is a nutritionally a carbohydrate has a high glycemic index-as do a lot of carbs. honestly never heard of the whole mare issue thing from feeding it.
There are some GREAT nutrition sites out there with good and accurate info. I really was not really impressed by the level of info on that site on my quick trip thru to look at that post..
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Old 01-03-2006, 04:52 PM  
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I tried to go to that site, but it said the document wasn't available.

I do mix cracked corn with the pelleted high protein feed during the winter when I feed. My horses all stay in pasture and need the extra calories during the cold months. I have 4 horses, never had any problems with any of them being sick or developing colic. Several of my friends feed the same combination of feed, and no one has had a problem with it. These horses include trail and show horses. They all have good coats and weight. I think corn has it's place in feeding, but as in all things, has to be done correctly.

The only problem I have known any of my friends to have with feeding it was when there was apparently some that was spoiled that wasn't detected, which could happen with any feed.
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Old 01-04-2006, 05:41 PM  
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One of the things I've noticed about a lot of the processed bagged big name (and big dollar) feeds is they don't tell you what is actually in the feed. If you look at the labels they state grain and grain products or grain by products. OK-what kind of grain and grain products? They don't say, oats, corn, soybean meal, etc.

So anyone feeding a processed feed actually doesn't know what they are really feeding their horse. They only know the how much protien & fat, vitamins or trace minerals that are reported in the feed, but no way of knowing where they are coming from. I've often wondered why the big name feed companies don't list them. I think it's to make people think they are getting something "special" because of the brand name and so people don't realize they are feeding pretty basic ingredients, like corn, oats, beet pulp, soymeal etc.

It has aways bugged me. We have a grain mixed at our feed mill so I know exactly what is in it and how much of each grain, which vitamins, minerals, trace mineral salts etc.

I think a lot of people would be surprised if the feed labels actually put what the "real ingredients" are in their feed. Many are beet pulp based and most people feeding them don't even know it.

I would have to guess the fellow that fed his horse the corn either had tainted or spoiled corn or that he overfed the horse a new feed (the corn) it hadn't been getting. Corn is a pretty basic grain in almost all horse feeds and if fed properly has never caused problems in any horses I'm aware of. It's a good feed to increase calorie content when you want to add weight to a horse but needs to be fed properly and not overfed.
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Old 01-04-2006, 06:20 PM  
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My tag has all the info on it-yours don't Deb?
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Old 01-04-2006, 07:04 PM  
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I have my feed mixed at the feed mill, I don't buy processed feed. I've looked at the tags for feeds like strategy and some of the purina feeds and they do not list the exact ingredients. I have not been able to figure out why they put grain products and not list exactly what grain they are talking about when they list grain products or grain by products. Next time your at a feed store take a look at the tags and you will see what I mean.
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Old 01-04-2006, 07:35 PM  
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I guess so-but then I wouldn't buy it
I want to know what and how much of what I am giving my horses.
I do not feed enough to have mine custom milled
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Old 01-04-2006, 09:30 PM  
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Not only does whole corn can cause colic, you can also founder a horse to.
It can also cause major problems if a horse has liver damage or disease.
A friend and I leased a mare and stallion. After going to check them out before we leased, I told the owner that the stallion did not look or act like he felt good. After a week of having him home, he did not eat well, and became very lethargic. Vet was called out, and lots of test ran and to the owner not knowing when he purchased them, they both had liver damage.
Stallion to the point of having to be put down. The mare was in foal, and one month after foaling, she to had to be put down.
What caused the onset was 3 weeks before we got them the owner fed them whole corn. Feeding corn mixed with other feed is great. Most feeds has corn, but feeding just corn, from my experience, is asking for trouble.

I found this site that gives some good info on certain types of feed ingrediants as well as bran, oil and such.
http://www.petalia.com.au/Templates/...tory_no=1 283
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Old 01-04-2006, 10:20 PM  
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Snickers, corn is a perfectly acceptable feed for horses and has been fed to horses forever. It's common practice for farmers to turn their horses and cattle out into corn fields after they have been harvested in the midwest states where we grow a lot of corn to glean missed cobs or dropped corn. We've done it for years with no ill effects. We've also fed corn for 35 years with no ill effects.

If the horses you mentioned developed liver problems after consuming corn, the corn most likely was contaminated with aflatoxins and was of poor quality. Aflatoxins are a mold and will cause liver damage in horses and other animals that consume the contaminated feed. Most mills and feed plants test corn for aflatoxins, and other mycotoxins and it is rejected if found to be infected. Corn would not be the culprit in causing the liver damage but mycotoxins in the corn would be. Big difference here.

Horses can colic and/or founder from rich hay, grass, oats, any change in diet, a change in the weather sets some horses off.

The guy that was feeding the horses may have been feeding contaminated feed for quite some time not realizing there was a problem with it. Good quality corn fed in reasonable amounts (IMO one to two pounds a day) is not going to harm or kill your horse any more than any other good quality feed would.
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Old 01-04-2006, 10:39 PM  
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corn is an excellent horse feed! its very rich in oil, starch and sugars, and low in fiber - all excellent properties for an equine forage supplement. It's easily digested and takes up very little bulk in a horse's diet, leaving more space for hay and grass (this is a good thing). However, those very properties make corn an easily overfed grain, causing collic, excess weight gain, excitability, stocking up, laminitis and founder (not neccesarily in that order). Straight corn must be fed very carefully, in closely controlled portions. Also, corn alone cannot comprise a very large part of the bulk of a horse's diet. Horses need lots of long fiber, and corn has very little fiber at all.

When feeding corn, either whole or cracked, you must measure strictly by weight - the shape of the kernel allows great variation in the amount of corn in a given vollume. And, since it is such a potent feed, very small diferences in quantity can make a big diference in the horse. If you're not equiped or willing to weigh your horse's feed, stick to other grains or proccessed feed.

As a proccessed feed, corn is commonly crushed and formed into pellets or flakes, popped, or extruded in attempts to make it less concentrated and easier to measure. All of the problems associated by horsekeepers with corn are rooted in either overfeeding or spoiled feed.

As a rule of thumb, think of dried corn as being 5 times as rich as sweetfeed! (and with less than a quarter of the fiber) In many parts of this country, corn is the most economical feed available, and is fed regularily to horses without problems - provided care is taken in measuring and portioning is matched to an individual horse's dietary needs.
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Old 01-04-2006, 10:45 PM  
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corn feed

i had one vet tell me never feed whole corn to a horse then my other vet told me to feed whole corn,to a horse i had just bought that was under-nurished to. the guy i buy my hay from was born and raised on the farm and is the typical ornary old farmer from back in the day....he has one horse and the horse is over 30yrs old. the horse gets hay and dried corn on the cob everyday 2 times a day. the horse is just as fiesty as my 4 year old quarter horse and my 8 year old stallion put together. i dont feed whole corn if i dont have to. but i thought i would just add that little bit
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Old 01-04-2006, 10:45 PM  
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Deb,
yes, I know that corn is fed to horses and has been for eons. But as in my post, the horses had allready had liver problems and feeding the whole corn caused the problem to progress. The stallions liver was shot, as well as the mares, and the owner did not know this when he bought them and as per Vet, with liver damage, it reacted to liver shut down.
Feeding in moderation, not over load. I feed corn. I was giving examples as to what can happen. Yes, I also know a horse can colic from just about anything. As with any feed, if they are not use to it, can cause some type of problem. I feed cracked corn mixed in with other types of feed. Some horses can handle whole corn and some cant.
My father worked in feed mills since he was 17 and owned his own. We use to have ours mixed as you did. But we always fed cracked corn mixed.
I as you, like to know what is in my feed and read the labels. We have a few mills left around here that still mix their own feed and will mix what you want to.
I am sure there are people who have good and bad feeding whole corn, I being one that has not had good, and yes, I have no doubt it was bad corn that those horses got, but not knowing they allready had damage allready, caused major problems.
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Old 01-05-2006, 06:19 AM  
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We've been feeding my horse corn since winter started and he's doing great on it and has gained alot of weight. I haven't had any problems with him on it and he seems more alert and has more energy (wich he needed).
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Old 01-05-2006, 07:06 AM  
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Wouldn't whole corn be hard for a horse to chew up well? If you are using it as a supplement for weight gain would you add cracked corn right in with the sweet feed? A lb? Just interested, I usually have at least one horse that needs to gain weight.
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Old 01-05-2006, 07:35 AM  
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For weight gain there are many other things that are much more effective[rice bran,oil].
Corn is cheap-I will grant you that
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Old 01-05-2006, 07:44 AM  
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There are alot of other things to add for weight gain, but corn is inexpensive. If you want to start adding corn to your horse's feed, start with an extra quarter pound, and increase by another quarter pound every 4-6 days till the horse starts to gain. If the sweet feed already has corn in it, you can increase faster.
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Old 01-05-2006, 07:45 AM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ToveroMom
For weight gain there are many other things that are much more effective[rice bran,oil].
Corn is cheap-I will grant you that
Exactly.
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Old 01-05-2006, 07:59 AM  
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I have never tried the corn for weight gain. I never thought corn was that great of a things to feed horses straight. I was just interested to hear if it had worked well for others ( I am always open to learn new things). For weight gain I use 12% sweet feed (I get them up to 2 small scoops 2X a day, I think the scoops are a 1qt with 2 scoops beet pulp and supplement with 1 cup calf manna and 1 cup corn oil. So far this has worked well for several different horses. It seems to produce a nice steady weight gain. I also feed 2-3 flakes 2X a day of a good grass mix hay. Its always fun to hear others experience and advice!
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Old 01-05-2006, 08:00 AM  
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Cheapest feed is not my main concern.
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