Horse Forum
Home Forum Home Search Horses for Sale Other ClassifiedsNEW! Post an Ad Help

Go Back   Horsetopia Forum > Horse Advice > Health & Nutrition
Note: Forum logins are completely separate
from your Horsetopia classifieds account or wishlist.
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 10-15-2005, 09:54 AM  
Coming two
 
babycakes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 1,626
Ring worm

Someone just purchased a horse from the sales about a week ago. They just had him vetted and he has ring worm. The horse hasn't been turned out yet, he's been kept in his stall.

I'm just a little worried about my horses catching it. My horse are wormed every 6 weeks. And haven't had much interaction with the new horse. From what I thought worms can really only be caught from maure and grass and stuff like that. Anything I should be doing for my horses to kepe them from getting it? They're due to be wormed pretty soon. Should I worm them now instead? My vet is coming next week for shots, but I just wanted to see if there's antyhing I can be doing for them.
__________________

Jena <3
babycakes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2005, 10:03 AM  
Started
 
mestep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Crab Orchard, Ky
Posts: 2,246
IMO, I would go ahead and worm your guys again just to be on the safe side! Cause I know with us any thing new that comes here gets wormed before it even steps off the trailer and we reworm all of our others as well, just to be safe! Good luck, I am sure someone else will have some great advice on the situation at hand!


edited to add! I am sorry I am having a dumb moment thinking bout round worms not fing worm!
__________________
mestep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2005, 10:06 AM  
Yearling Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Michigan
Posts: 547
ring worm is an external fungi, meaning it is on the skin, just touching a sore can transmit the "worm" (spore).

i'm not sure in horses, but I think it is the same. I worked at a vets office and if an animal came in with ring worm you would have to clean everything down with bleach water. That means anything that came into contact with that animal including yourself. it spreads by contact. so if you touched that animal then touched your own they could get it, you yourself can get it from your pet. Like these owners that brought their kitten for treatment, when they came in again both owners had ring "worm". After handling the animals we had to scrub down with baitadine.

Best thing...I may be wrong, someone can correct me...is to not allow contact between horses, through any means. So if you touch that horse wash before you touch your horse or anything that comes into contact with your horse, don't use the same groom brushes and that sorta thing....I'm not sure if an oral de-wormer will help ring worm since its not an actual worm or keep them from getting it....Good luck, keep us posted.
__________________
Brandy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2005, 10:28 AM  
Coming two
 
jyates's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: SouthWest Arkansas
Posts: 1,678
My 2 sisters and me got ring worms from some barn cats
when we were kids but I never was sure of how the
ring worms were passed around!

Thanks for the info!
jyates is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2005, 10:42 AM  
Long Yearling
 
mellowdane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Suquamish, WA
Posts: 1,465
Send a message via MSN to mellowdane
Oral de-wormers arent going to do anything for ring-worm. It is a fungal infection that only has worm in the name because of the type of lesions it produces on the skin. Brandy is right on with cleaning. Keep all brushes seperate and after contact wash your hands. Ringworm spores are found in a lot of soil, and when exposed to broken skin can take up residence on your animal. Most animals have a strong enough immune system to kick it out before it starts, but animals that are stressed, ill, young old.. you get the idea.. will pick up the fungus.

If there are clear lesions, you can put Lamasil ointment or cream on them (athletes foot medication.. it is the same type of infection). Ring-worm does not like sun and it doesnt like being dry. Unfortunately that makes this a great time of year for infection. The lesions will shed spores in to the surrounding area (bedding, walls if they are rubbed on) so make sure the stall stays clean and use a 10% bleach solution to clean the walls. Generally just using a pump sprayer and spraying everything until wet works fine. Things need to stay wet for about 15 minutes to kill everything though. Usually once there is some treatment going on, things stay sanitary and the stress level drops the animal can kick out the fungus on their own.

It can be transmitted to people and other pets so make sure contact is limited and the people that do have contact wash up well and arent already ill (that would make them more likely to pick it up).

You can use a florescent blacklight to scan the horses body for spots of ringworm if you are treating it topically. Not all types of ringworm floresce the same.. but usually a spot will have a sickly green color (sort of like kriptonite..haha) but some strains will look bright purple. Scratches and other things can show up too.. but typically you just have to look for ringed areas of yucky green. Fetlocks, pasterns, ears, around the eyes, nose, chin, inside of the flanks, the girth area.. those are probably going to be the most likely spots.

Haha.. ok.. a little longwinded.. but although ringworm isnt the biggest problem you will have to deal with in the long term.. it can be bloody stubborn to get rid of... good luck!
Melisa
__________________

Has is occurred to you that there's a certain inefficiency in questioning me on things you've already made up your mind about? - Spock
mellowdane is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2005, 10:42 AM  
Greenbroke Member
 
joustinggirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Boones Mill, Virgina
Posts: 3,816
Its not a worm at all. Its a fungus that is spread by contact. People can get it as well as other animals. So wash very well between animals and don't share blankets and tack.
__________________

Pink Tiger says 'Grrrrrr'
joustinggirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2005, 11:13 AM  
Kid Safe
 
Range's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Back of Beyond
Posts: 7,281
ring worm

Yep, everyone is right, ringworm is a fungus. There are many, many fungicides out there that will kill it, it just needs to be applied at least daily. With most topical applications, it takes about 7 days to clear up. There may be a spot without hair for a while, but the fungus itself is gone once the scabby material on top is gone. One home remedy I've read about, but haven't tried, is applying apple cider vinegar to the area. I've had it, got it from a cat, and let me tell you...it itches like crazy!

We usually have issues with it in the spring and the fall, even with horses that aren't young, ill, or stressed...just a couple of spots.

Like everyone else has said, wash your hands after touching a spot before touching anything else. Keep brushes, blankets, tack separate until it clears up and wash everything regularly.

Remember, it does itch like crazy!
__________________

"Be careful what you wish for, because you just might get it all... you just might get it all, and then some you don't want." Chris Daughtery

www.goatsandsoaps.com for all your Boer goat and bath soap needs.
Range is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2005, 11:40 AM  
Started
 
Horse_Orderly's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 2,326
Better yet, get a box of latex gloves from your local drug store. We had a horse at work with ringworm and we all had to wear gloves to do anything in the stall.
Horse_Orderly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2005, 11:54 AM  
Yearling Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Michigan
Posts: 547
^^^ good idea with the gloves (as long as you don't accidently touch your form on them....). Oh....danderuff shows up under the black light too! ....hahaha, doc got me.....inside joke....anyway great advice everyone!
__________________
Brandy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2005, 12:41 PM  
Coming two
 
babycakes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 1,626
Thanks everyone. I was wondering why he was washing the horse down with bleach. I thought it was kinda odd. Well I have basically no contact with the horse. He's in his stall with the door closed, and it's a full door so he can't really touch anyone. I'll just stay further away. My one horse is next to him, and my other two are across from him. I'm hoping since he's pretty much locked in they won't be able to touch him. Although my 2 year old did sniff him through the bars the other day. But I'm hoping they're ok and don't get it. I'll just be on the lookout for it. Boy I hope they don't get it....
__________________

Jena <3
babycakes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2005, 01:12 PM  
Coming two
 
babycakes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 1,626
Ok I am VERY angry now. I just looked it up in one of my books and read about just how contagious it is. I am PISSED. This horse has been in our barn for about a week and finally today someone told us that he has ringworm. In the book it said that it can even be passed on by flies. There are three barns up there and our is the "rough" board barn. This horse is on "full" board and is in our barn. I feel like going up there and giving the woman who does the full board a piece of my mind. Why wasn't he moved into her barn with all of her horses? Instead he's in our barn with my 2 year old and 24 year old who are even more suceptible to getting it. I am fuming right now.

I know I asked before, but is there anything I can do to keep my horses ring worm free? I am really going to go nuts on someone if one of my horses ends up getting ring worm. Shouldn't this horse be quarantined?
__________________

Jena <3
babycakes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2005, 01:20 PM  
Bombproof Member
 
QuarterCowGirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Ontario, CANADA
Posts: 7,590
I had ring worm a few summers ago, not fun. As far I as I know it's only passed by making direct contact with the fungus itself. I got my case of it from one of my cows. I don't know if you'd want to do it on a horse, but applying used oil burns it off. It works well and it works fast. So perhaps you could tell the owner this trick.
__________________
I'm a farmer - I'll grow on you.
QuarterCowGirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2005, 02:11 PM  
Coming two
 
TheUpNorthCowgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 1,609
Quote:
I was wondering why he was washing the horse down with bleach.
Okay woah wait a second...He should NOT be washing his horse with bleach! Bleach can be caustic to a horses skin! A horse with ringworm should be bathed in an Iodine or Betadine solution and then the lesions should be coated with Lotrimin (or any other anti-fungal foot spray) once a day. The infestation will not affect you unless you touch his horse and then touch your horse, his horse touches your horse, or something that horse uses comes into contact with your horse (like don't put your horse in that horses stall and don't use his water bucket etc.). Ringworm is almost impossible to kill in a stable setting. You can bleach the walls etc. but ringworm can live in the soil for up to a year. Ringworm will usually only attack a weakened system as well. Foals and older horses are more suceptible as well as horses with open wounds or other infections. Ringworm is a oppurtunistic fungus. Hope that helps...It spread through my weanling/yearling band this year and after a bath with iodine and lotrimin for about a week it disappeared.
__________________
7 Year Member "Betwixt the stirrup and the ground. Mercy I asked, Mercy I found."
TheUpNorthCowgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2005, 02:29 PM  
Kid Safe
 
muttduck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Central Kentucky
Posts: 7,183
Everyone has nailed what Ringworm is on the head.

As for preventing it from spreading to yours, you can bleach or lysol your stalls, and in between areas like the aisle... You can always bathe them in iodine shampoo as a preventitve. I would just watch your horses around the edges of the ears first, that is where I seemed to recall it showing first.

Now, why did she put him in the partial board barn??
I would think the people that are partial boarding are there with their animals more often and can keep a closer watch for anything unusual.
Another reason, and no offense meant, but she probably figured the full boarders are spending more money each month, and would be just as offended, and didn't want to risk losing that bigger income.
__________________
www.woodburnedpetportraits.com - Custom wood burned stall plaques, portraits, and farm signs, featuring your equine or pet.
www.buckeyehollowfarm.com- Rex, Dutch Rabbits & Percentage Boer Goats
muttduck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2005, 02:52 PM  
Long Yearling
 
mellowdane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Suquamish, WA
Posts: 1,465
Send a message via MSN to mellowdane
Babycakes.. it is ok.. ringworm is not the complete evil that book says it is. Your horse isnt going to get it by a casual sniff.. a fly.. or just being near the other horse. It is going to have to be direct contact and transfer of spores to broken skin. What I mean by that is.. cats will often get it around their ears and eyes because they get the dirt in their nails and scratch their skin.. the spores get access to broken skin and settle in and make themselves happy.

Shepdog had an older cat that due to illness kept ringworm in her house for months and slept with her and the other cats.. took Shep 2 months to get a case of ringworm herself (one tiny spot after she had the flu) and none of her other cats got it at all.

I worked with PAWS and had to deal with a ton of ringworm cats. I made sure I washed regularly but even after being around 15-30 cats with ringworm I NEVER had a case and none of my animals got it either. Keep up clean barn habits and everyone will probably be just fine.

As for treatments.. sure bleach will kill it.. but it is very harsh on the skin and unless the bleach is like 10% concentrate and stays in contact for 10 minutes minimum.. it will not kill it all. In addition.. the spores are under the scabbing so it is only going to clean surface spores. Just using Lamasil or Lotrimin cream or ointment on the spots will work more effectively and be less irritating on the skin. Betadine wash works pretty well too, but you dont want to leave it on the skin like you would an antifungal ointment.

I am sure the stress of the auction and such just made that horse more succeptable.. your horse is healthy and has a good immune system so dont worry.. it will all be just fine!!
__________________

Has is occurred to you that there's a certain inefficiency in questioning me on things you've already made up your mind about? - Spock
mellowdane is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2005, 05:03 PM  
Coming two
 
babycakes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 1,626
I'm sorry guys, I'm just so mad! Maybe I should make a seperate post for a vent?

The women just makes me so mad. She walked into the barn today and I asked her is he had ringworm and I got a causual "Yea so don't let your horses near him". It gets better, she told this guy who was doing the stalls not to touch the horse because of it. So I have my horse on the cross ties and I see the guy go to put the horse in my stall. Boy did he hear it from me.

I dono, call me an idiot, but I thought it would have been smart for her to tell everyone with horses there about so they were extra careful. But nope of course not. I practically had to yell at someone not to touch him.

Ugh some people....

I can't wait for my barn to be done...
__________________

Jena <3
babycakes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2005, 05:08 PM  
Bombproof Member
 
QuarterCowGirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Ontario, CANADA
Posts: 7,590
Geez, is there another barn you could board your horses until your barn gets done? I wouldn't want to tolerate that, just imagine what they do there when you're not there.....
__________________
I'm a farmer - I'll grow on you.
QuarterCowGirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2005, 06:06 PM  
ray
Long Yearling
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,133
I feel for ya, something like that can drive you crazy I have been there. I boarded at this place that brought in two rescuses that where bags of bones covered in lice and mud fever. Well the owners of the place turned them out into a field next to my horse where they could meet over the fence. I went beserk!!! Anyhow when they got the vet out and cleaned the horses up and they got some weight on and health back everyone was ok including my horse, he never ended up catching anything.
__________________

If wishes were horses, then beggers would ride!
ray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2005, 06:41 PM  
Greenbroke Member
 
joustinggirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Boones Mill, Virgina
Posts: 3,816
Don't be too worried, I think the chance of any other horse getting it is going to be pretty low. But how did his horse get it? They can get it from the soil, so I guess somebody could get it from the source he got it from.
Believe it or not, I have handled kittens with it and I have tried to get it, and couldn't. I have tried to get poison ivy or oak too, no go. So I guess some immune systems are going to be stronger against it.
__________________

Pink Tiger says 'Grrrrrr'
joustinggirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2005, 07:15 PM  
Started
 
Sassy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern Alberta, Canada
Posts: 2,591
Send a message via MSN to Sassy
Ring Worm

Oh yah tell me about it. We currently are in the midst of an out break of ring worm brought in by an outside horse. Got a yearling palamino, had her quarentined for the costumary 30 days, buddied her up then turned her out with the group! That was fine until three days after being turned out she starts to develope these big flacky bumps on her weither neck and flank (RING WORM). Well that was 4 months ago, we have been fighting it one horse at a time since, as they break out! Seems to be going one horse at a time down the line! Even with seperating those individuals that have the legions it has still spread like wild fire. We have disenfected everything that the horse come into contact with! But with the wet humid summer we had here hasn't made it very easy to keep it under comtrol. I would do what ever steps nessesary to keep your horses far from the infected animal. The stall it occupies shoud not be occupied by any other animal until the stall is thoroughly disinfected! The animal should be put some where, where it will have no contact with other horses until it is clear from the fungi and legions! A good bathing with a 10%-bleech, 20% iodine and water mixture sure made a difference in controling the indivdiual horses amount of legions, but not all horses like to be bathed! We got a wonderful anfugal topical cream from our vet, works really good! I think we are finally getting a head of the game as we have had only one new out break in the last 4 weeks! It is alot of work to keep it under control.
__________________
A horse which stops dead just before a jump and thus propels its rider into a graceful arc provides a splendid excuse for general merriment.
~ DUKE OF ENDINBURGH ~
Sassy is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply

  Horsetopia Forum > Horse Advice > Health & Nutrition


Thread Tools



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:18 PM.


Board Powered by vBuletin ® Copyright © 2000 - 2007 Jel Soft

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.2.0