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Old 08-02-2011, 10:31 PM  
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Haynets: yes or no

Hi there.My BO placed a hay net in my horse's stall the other day. She said the haynet is a good way to feed horse's like mine (he makes a mess of his hay, just like most of the other horses do) plus 'it would keep him busy in his stall' when he's in there overnight or in bad weather.

Now she wants to know if I want to buy it from her (LOL)
Not sure I want or not...he did eat the hay from it today but I think only bc there was no other hay available to him.

What do you all think? Do you like haynets? Is it good for horses?
thanks!
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Old 08-02-2011, 10:54 PM  
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IMO a haynet is just that... a place to hang hay from. Nothing special unless you want it kept off the ground. It does (usually) tend to stay more tidy. Just be careful where and how low you hang it... I've seen horses freak during a storm or other disaster and get their legs caught in the nets.. not real common, but still a risk! If your horse kicks the stall or is a bit hyper in his stall I'd take the mess and leave it on the ground.. my opinion. Also, what is she charging you for it? Because those things are dirt cheap at TSC
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Old 08-02-2011, 11:38 PM  
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Originally Posted by akustelega View Post
IMO a haynet is just that... a place to hang hay from. Nothing special unless you want it kept off the ground. It does (usually) tend to stay more tidy. Just be careful where and how low you hang it... I've seen horses freak during a storm or other disaster and get their legs caught in the nets.. not real common, but still a risk! If your horse kicks the stall or is a bit hyper in his stall I'd take the mess and leave it on the ground.. my opinion. Also, what is she charging you for it? Because those things are dirt cheap at TSC
she's asking $65
It's made of nylon. When I went to see my boy earlier tonight the haynet was empty, on the floor of his stall. I hung it back up on the wall without thinking and hurried back home since it was statin to storm.

I just read stories of some horses not only getting their feet caught up in the net but also getting strangled up in it!! also, bc these haynets are usually hung on a wall it's not a natural position for a horse to "graze"

Too bad, I'm all for anything to keep my horse from being bored but this haynet seems too risky for a young curious active horse like mine I'm gonna pass on it...
any other experiences out there?
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Old 08-03-2011, 01:57 AM  
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I tie it up by taking the line and looping it through the O ring in the bottom of the net and then tying it up. This way as they eat it wont droop down at all to get their feet caught up. I just bought one for 50 cents.
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Old 08-03-2011, 02:11 AM  
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I started feeding my horses from hay bags last year. I bought 4 small holed mesh hay bags from Dover Saddlery....they were $9.95 last year, this year they're $14.95. I also have a Nibble Net brand fancy one.....now that one was almost $70.00......and worth every penny!!!!!

I even made a big mesh bag out of a hockey net.....it'll hold almost a whole bale of hay!

I only have one horse now, and I still feed 95% of the time from the Nibble Net or the hay bags. It makes my hay last longer, keeps my horse busy longer and my fatso hoover horse actually lost weight over the winter being fed from only his Nibble Net at night in his stall. I can put 2 flakes in the Nibble Net outside and 2 flakes in the hay bag in his run-in and he'll still have a little left at the end of the day. Hardly any gets trampled or pee'd on and the best part is it keeps him busy When I fed him just off the ground, 2 flakes would barely last a half an hour......now 2 flakes in a Nibble Net or a bag can last up to 3 or more hours. AND HE'S BUSY!!!

After feeding like this now for almost a year, Senator will actually chose the Nibble Net over hay on the ground.

I do think $65 is way too much for just a hay bag.....for that price you could buy a good quality Nibble Net. I do attach the bottom of my hay bags to a ring in the wall. Attaching the bottom makes so he can pull the hay out, but it doesn't swing all over and its far enough off the ground so it won't get hung up in his shoes. I tie the hay bag up to a ring with about 3 knots.....I've never had it fall down......and the Nibble Net is attached to a tree with rings and carabiners on all 4 corners.....it ain't falling off either.

If your interested I can post pics of what my bags look like. I LOVE feeding this way, its been the greatest thing for me and my horse!!!!
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Old 08-03-2011, 05:02 AM  
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Go buy a hay rack - cheaper and safer !!!

I agree hay to help with bordom. Plus its healther for them to nibble and keep their intestines moving. Reduses bowel obstructions and dehydration by drinking all the time too.
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Old 08-03-2011, 05:40 AM  
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Hay nets like anything else has pros and cons...

If placed at the correct height they do keep the hay tidier, less mess and waste from trampling it into soiled bedding or becoming soiled bedding.
If placed at the wrong height they become a potential hazard to your horse becoming entangled if he paws or strikes at the thing, also hay particles falling in to his eyes and becoming an irritant.
There are different kinds of haynets... slow feed(do just that.. slow feed the horse) or regular size openings that allow faster consumption and more pulled out and spilled to the ground...
There are also hay racks which are a variation of the hay net but a solid made structure that has the same pros and cons, except due to their shape they are usually placed higher on a wall or corner of the stall location.

Hay Nets are inexpensive... you can buy regular or slow feed from Chicks(www.chicksaddlery.com) for approx. $8.00 a piece plus shipping.

As for hay Racks .... they can be purchased from about $30.00 on up. Horse.com has them for this price along with many other companies or you can purchase them from TSC, your local feed dealer or tack shop.

As for the price of $65.00 for a hay net(nylon)... unless you are buying dozens of them, that price is ridiculous. If you really want one, go out and buy one for yourself and save a ton of money.
Hay nets come in two kinds of materail...cotton rope or nylon twine. Both have same pros and cons, but they say the cotton rope(they are white/light in color) will break if a horse gets hung up in it, nylon won't! Don't know this one for sure and don't ever want to find out honestly... it would give a nasty injury to the horse.
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Old 08-03-2011, 06:33 AM  
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Nylon? Are you sure it isn't laced with gold?
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Old 08-03-2011, 06:36 AM  
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I like Hay Nets, I use them in the trailer and when I show. I don't use them in their stall as it can be time consuming taking the net up and down and putting hay in. I would say if you are going to get one, that a slow feed hay net is worth it (keeps them from making a mess and wasting it) but that's only if your horse won't eat it once he does drop it all over. As I said, my guys eat ALL their hay and I only use it for trailering and when I am out.

Not sure why she thinks her net is worth that much money, and for a Barn Owner a Hay Net "like I said" can be time consuming thus not a money saver when it comes to hay wasting. If he waists his hay he is getting way too much per feeding but that's just my opinion.

ALSO, if your going to hang a hay net, I would think it would be in a secure spot in a corner up high or if you have open stall doors, hang it on the outside of the stall, thus keeping even the droppings clean for the next use.
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Old 08-03-2011, 07:00 AM  
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I use a hayBAG! It's all nylon and your horse has a less likely chance to get it's hoof caught in it. I use one to give my gelding his hay all the time.

Or I would use a hay rack, but be careful there are no edges that could cut your horse or hurt them.

Nothing is 100% horse safe though.
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Old 08-03-2011, 07:35 AM  
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I only use a hay net or bag when the horse is in the trailer or at a show. When at home I place the hay on the stall floor or on the ground. I have always been told it is better for them to eat in the position they would naturally graze in (head down), plus I don't have to worry that the horse will get tangled in the hay net and get hurt.
I certainly wouldn't pay her $65 for it! Like the others have said...you can buy them pretty cheap at most places.
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Old 08-03-2011, 07:43 AM  
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$65 I just got one for $5!!! Nylon. The pretty purple rope one was like $15 or something, I'm cheap lol. They make me worry because they can get caught up if the slip too low or fall on the floor. I just bought it for the show to tie it on the trailer for travel or when she is tied all day at the shows. Otherwise if I were using it full time in the stall I'd go with a hay bag. Costs more (not $65 more) but I feel it's safer if knocked down.
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Old 08-03-2011, 08:29 AM  
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$65!?! Please DO NOT buy hers... that is ridiculous! If you do decide to go with either the hay net... or bag (which I think is the better option) please go with one of these and save yourself the cash!

http://www.chicksaddlery.com/page/CDS/PROD/SF1802 - net

http://www.chicksaddlery.com/page/CDS/PROD/2400/NHB51 -bag
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Old 08-03-2011, 08:30 AM  
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I bought the nibblenets last winter for my barn.. absolutely love them.. slows the consumption of the hay.. aids digestion... cuz they can have food in front at all times.. and keeps stalls neater.. (however that was not why I got them). My daughters one horse has an ulcer.. so this way he always has feed, and the other one tends to get too fat, so she eats half what she used to.. looks great is happy.. Before I would give her her two flakes and they would be inhaled in an hour and she wanted more.


Cons- I only have one horse with shoes so have to keep it way high for him.. which means daily I have hay down my front.. lol.

On the horses without shoes I can put the net out on the ground, when they are out during the day.. they can play with it.. eat it.. not waste..

Good luck
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Old 08-03-2011, 09:07 AM  
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Originally Posted by Lady_MCSE View Post
Nylon? Are you sure it isn't laced with gold?


Hahahaha...yeah no kidding right? I thought that was a little pricey but
I just found the website she bought the haynets from...this is the actual product. They are expensive. I think it's comparable to the nibble net some of you mentioned. It looks safe enough I guess..I would imagine the older haynets made of rope or nylon rope were the ones horses were getting all tangled up in bc of the larger openings.
Like I said,I already found it on the floor of his stall yesterday after it came off the wall...could I lay this net flat on the bottom of a large feeding tub or should it be anchored down somehow?
I think I may give it a try but $65 is pricey...I may shop around for my own...

what do you all think?


http://www.busyhorse.com/busygrande.html

BUSY GRANDE
REGULAR FEEDER
Hay Bag




The BUSY GRANDE REGULAR FEEDER accommodates appx. 2 flakes + of hay. It is designed to make the meal last longer and reduce the amount of hay waste. Hung at head height against a solid surface like a box stall wall or the side of a pipe corral the BUSY GRANDE REGULAR FEEDER artificially replicates natural grazing. Used along with the BUSY SNACKER will keep your horse occupied and happy for a loooong time. Remember, A BUSY HORSE IS A HAPPY HORSE.

Last edited by CarolNoelle : 08-03-2011 at 09:41 AM.
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Old 08-03-2011, 09:34 AM  
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I use hay bags instead of nets, and only when I'm at shows or my horse is tied to a trailer
In my stalls I just have corner feeders that I made by just putting a piece of plywood across the corner, about a foot or so high. It allows horses to eat at ground level. My horse's aren't in stalls except before shows
The rest of the time, Smilie is in a large corral with a shelter, and I use tractor tire feeders. I feed her three times a day, and just before I go to sleep, around 10, so she is never out of hay for long and doesn't over eat at any one meal
Since I feed her safe grass hay, ride her regularily, she is in great shape, even though she has pretty much all the hay she can eat, along with two feedings of soaked beet pulp

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Old 08-03-2011, 10:01 AM  
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I use hay bags instead of nets, and only when I'm at shows or my horse is tied to a trailer
In my stalls I just have corner feeders that I made by just putting a piece of plywood across the corner, about a foot or so high. It allows horses to eat at ground level. My horse's aren't in stalls except before shows
The rest of the time, Smilie is in a large corral with a shelter, and I use tractor tire feeders. I feed her three times a day, and just before I go to sleep, around 10, so she is never out of hay for long and doesn't over eat at any one meal
Since I feed her safe grass hay, ride her regularily, she is in great shape, even though she has pretty much all the hay she can eat, along with two feedings of soaked beet pulp

Hi Smilie
hey those are great ideas! I like the corner feeder idea esp! So all you do is set off a corner of the stall with a piece of plywood so they don't get hay everywhere? So simple!

What do you think of this busy bag hay net? He did eat all of the hay from it before it fell on the floor yesterday.....
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Old 08-03-2011, 10:09 AM  
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I just have to figure out the safest one to use so he doesn't get caught up in it somehow. How does a horse get one around his neck I wonder? Must be the larger opening rope ones?? The one she bought is nylon with small square openings, and like I said, I already found it on the floor on the first day (it was on the wall inside his stall).
What is the ideal height for this thing? Can I lay it in the bottom of a big tub so it's laying flat or does it need to be secured somehow?

Carol... for myself and this is only my opinion....

In a stall I would put in 2 or more eye-hooks, one approximately 5'+ in the air and the other eye hook about 3' high. Fill your hay net, take the slack out of the fill opening(this gives you a long "string"), put the string through the upper eye hook and pull the hay net up all the way, now with a double end snap, clip the loose string end to the hay net at the bottom on the backside away from the horse. If you really want to keep the net secure put in 2 more eye hooks and use double end snaps at either side to keep the entire thing attached close to the wall.

Hay nets can be a pest to fill but a slow feed hay net can cut down on consumption and amount of hay being fed with the horse maintaining their weight. My time is "free" for my horses, if doing this saves me $$ in feed bills or lets my horse reduce his boredom and "graze" as they are supposed to do, to me its worth the extra effort. Having the ability for my horse to eat almost constantly as nature and their digestive system is optimally made to do is a plus to me... I don't see my vet very often but for routine care...not stomach or digestive upsets(colic).

I never tried the hay bags but they may work even better than nets. Either way, the more secure the thing is to the wall the less chance of entanglement happening...

As for how a horse got his head caught... sounds to me like the loose string end wasn't securely fastened and wove through the net to safeguard the horse.

I would not put a net on the ground under any circumstance if the horse has shoes, even barefoot the chance of entanglement is to great a risk to me...

I do remember seeing a older post about someone making their own hay net/rack... it was very ingenious, cheap and served the purpose of feeding, not wasting and keeping the horses safe all at the same time. Take a peek at the older posts and see if that helps you out any.

Good luck. Hope that info helps give some ideas of how to safely use the things.



BTW: the height I used and gave you worked for my 16.2 hand Thoroughbred, hard keeper horse... adjust the height of hanging the net to what your horse needs. In my horse trailer, when I hang a hay net for traveling and munching the "tie ring" is welded from the manufacturer at approx. 6' from the floor. I have a 7'+ high trailer...the horse never struggles to reach nor has the opportunity to catch his hoof in the thing... do remember though he is confined in a "stall" atmosphere.
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Old 08-03-2011, 10:25 AM  
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I put slow feed hay nets in my paddock for two reasons. One is that my mare doesn't have access to grass. If I put the hay on the ground, she would eat it in an hour and then just stand around bored all day. In the slow feed net, she has to "graze" instead of gobble, so the hay lasts from one feeding to the next, meaning she never doesn't have hay in front of her. In my opinion, this is healthier for her digestive system.

The other reason I use nets is because my gelding, who can't eat hay, will happily pee all over it if it's left on the ground. Naturally, my mare isn't keen on eating pee-covered food. I don't want to have to separate them, so I use the nets to keep the hay off the ground and out of Chance's urinary reach. I use two nets so that Sugar can't be chased off her hay. Although he can't chew hay, Chance will occasionally play with it, which gives him something to do between feedings.

I got my nets from Chick's Saddlery for around $7 each, plus shipping. I would never pay $65 for a hay net.
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Old 08-03-2011, 10:35 AM  
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$65!?! Please DO NOT buy hers... that is ridiculous! If you do decide to go with either the hay net... or bag (which I think is the better option) please go with one of these and save yourself the cash!

http://www.chicksaddlery.com/page/CDS/PROD/SF1802 - net

http://www.chicksaddlery.com/page/CDS/PROD/2400/NHB51 -bag

I thought the bags would be a better option as well, and I bought two of them. They were easy to fill and I loved them, but my horses destroyed them both in less than a month. They pulled the net "window" off the front, completely shredding the edge of the nylon in the process. I tried repairing them several times before just giving up and throwing them away. Neither horse is particularly destructive, so I think the bags were just cheaply made.

Despite being less expensive, the nets seem much tougher. They've lasted several months so far, even being out in all weathers.
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