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Old 05-27-2011, 10:21 PM  
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Horse has WORMS

Ok, I just heard one of the horses at my old barn has worms--seen in her poop and around her anus!! Is this fairly common?

When I boarded there for 6 mos the vet came out regularly and wormed them...this is the same barn where the horses get poor quality round bale hay and some horses are really thin right now.

Why would this horse have worms and what should be done about it? Can these worms hurt this horse? Is it contagious? All these horses are kept in a herd together and share round bales and one water tub.

thanks for any info...
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Old 05-27-2011, 11:17 PM  
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Geez, by the time you actually see worms in the poo there is generally a heavy infestation. So yes, most of the others probly have worms too. Worms affect a lot of things on horses, so yes, it can hurt them. I would be consulting with my vet on the best way to handle this large of a worm load on the one horse and pulling fecals on the others.
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Old 05-27-2011, 11:30 PM  
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Yes, worms can hurt them. Heavy loads can cause colic, anemia, nutritional deficiencies. Killing them all off at once can cause blockages and allergic reactions. You have to realize that the different kinds of worms have different life cycles and can migrate through the body (intestinal walls, blood vessels, skin, eyes.) Killing off the adults and migrating larval forms can be dangerous and I agree that a vet should be consulted for this project.
Yes, if one horse is that infested, all the others are as well.

And no, worms do not have to be a normal part of a horse's life. I use rotational wormers 6 times a year - different meds that hit different worms at the most effective times. I also keep poop picked up daily. Fecal exams on my animals are negative.
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Old 05-28-2011, 01:17 AM  
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Horses need to be on a regular de-worming schedule, rotating through the different types of wormers. At our barn all horses are dewormed at the same time and we rotate through the different types so all types of worms etc., are hit.
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Old 05-28-2011, 02:01 AM  
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Thank you all for the advice Sounds like immediate action is required I will let the person who told me about this know, this sounds as serious as I thought it was! This poor horse!! I know her she is such a good horse she deserves better care than this, like all horses do!!deworming is basic care isn't it??? Could the poor quality hay give her worms like this or is it the wrong wormer or lack of deworming her?

In any case I hope she gets treatment immed. I have no idea why the boarders at this barn put up with the conditions there !!
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Old 05-28-2011, 03:55 AM  
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unfortunately, deworming one horse isn't going to be very effective. You have to do the whole herd, or she will just pick them right back up. In horses with that heavy a worm load, I start with a stongyd type dewormer and then switch to zimectren on the next rotation. Susan
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Old 05-28-2011, 11:03 AM  
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As DixieMom mentioned, a heavy load that is killed off all at once can be dangerous for the horse. A call to the vet might be in order, with a fecal sample sent to a lab in order to determine load.
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Old 05-28-2011, 11:33 AM  
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No, horses don't get worms from the type of feed, although poor quality feed will make them more susceptable, as horses in good health, develope some immunity towards worms, esp round worms
They become infected from fecal contamination, as eggs are shed and the horse will injest them. Immature forms of strongles (blood worm ) develope outside of the horse and are eaten by other horses, migrate through the body and mature in the GI tract-lay eggs and start the entire process over again
That is why deworming a single horse in a herd is not effective parasite mangement.
The more confined a herd is, forced to eat or graze on contaminated ground, the more frequent the need for de worming
I think the poor feed just reflects poor management in general, including de-worming, and would be surprised if that place had a regular vaccination program
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Old 05-28-2011, 12:00 PM  
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Now that we've scare this poor gal, let's offer a remedy. Consult your vet on what is best to use for a heavy infestation. You can buy the appropriate dewormer either from him or your local feed or tack store. It comes in a small diameter tube with a plunger. It is about the consistancy of tooth paste. Put this in the corner of his mouth (there might be some objection to this) and squirt it as high as you can then hold his head up for a minute. You may have to deworm again in 30 days.
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Old 05-28-2011, 12:06 PM  
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Also, the only worms you are able to see on the rectum, are pin worms (really, really small ) and segments of tape worms-thus if you see tapeworm segments, make sure you use a de-wormer effective against them
Or-are you seeing round worms in the manure as the horse poops?
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Old 05-28-2011, 05:01 PM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolNoelle View Post
Ok, I just heard one of the horses at my old barn has worms--seen in her poop and around her anus!! Is this fairly common?

When I boarded there for 6 mos the vet came out regularly and wormed them...this is the same barn where the horses get poor quality round bale hay and some horses are really thin right now.

Why would this horse have worms and what should be done about it? Can these worms hurt this horse? Is it contagious? All these horses are kept in a herd together and share round bales and one water tub.

thanks for any info...
1. Some of the story may or may not be missing, and that is not the fault of the OP.

Has this horse been at this barn for longer than 3 or 4 months. It could have come to the barn with a heavy worm load.

2. You can have a dozen horses in the same environment and they may or may not have different worm loads as some horses are better at shedding off than others.

2.1 I know that for fact because all four of my horses were wormed after the first hard frost last November. By mid-March two of the four had a couple counts into the low/med range for tapes and roundworms. Imagine my shock because I clean my stalls every day and those four horses have 22 acres to roam on

The two with the slightly higher wormload and the only ones to show tapes or roundworms were the two that are insulin resistant. IR horses have immune issues.

Under the vet's direction only these two horses were wormed (at the time) and the vet instructed me what to worm with and how much to use. This because of the growing worm resistance to different types of wormers but that's its own thread.

So now the vet tells me exactly what to worm with and how much, provided the fecal samples show a heavy enough load to merit some kind of wormer.

3. You don't know to what degree of truth the worm condition in the horse really is because you "heard" from someone else and the inference from your writing is that this person telling you the story is not the owner of the horse.

If the horse does, in fact, have visible worms in its manure and around its anus, yes the vet needs to see the horse and yes a fecal count needs to be done, as others have already suggested.

But unless you personally know the owner of the horse, and since your horse is not boarded there anymore, I doubt there's much you can do for the situation, provided there really is a situation.

If the entire boarding scene has gone pretty far south at the barn, you might try turning the BO in but that is very risky business and not something one should do if they are under 21 and have no one to help them.

I am not trying to take away from what might be a severe situation for the horse in question - just trying to establish the facts.
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Old 06-01-2011, 08:50 PM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk View Post
1. Some of the story may or may not be missing, and that is not the fault of the OP.

Has this horse been at this barn for longer than 3 or 4 months. It could have come to the barn with a heavy worm load.

2. You can have a dozen horses in the same environment and they may or may not have different worm loads as some horses are better at shedding off than others.

2.1 I know that for fact because all four of my horses were wormed after the first hard frost last November. By mid-March two of the four had a couple counts into the low/med range for tapes and roundworms. Imagine my shock because I clean my stalls every day and those four horses have 22 acres to roam on

The two with the slightly higher wormload and the only ones to show tapes or roundworms were the two that are insulin resistant. IR horses have immune issues.

Under the vet's direction only these two horses were wormed (at the time) and the vet instructed me what to worm with and how much to use. This because of the growing worm resistance to different types of wormers but that's its own thread.

So now the vet tells me exactly what to worm with and how much, provided the fecal samples show a heavy enough load to merit some kind of wormer.

3. You don't know to what degree of truth the worm condition in the horse really is because you "heard" from someone else and the inference from your writing is that this person telling you the story is not the owner of the horse.

If the horse does, in fact, have visible worms in its manure and around its anus, yes the vet needs to see the horse and yes a fecal count needs to be done, as others have already suggested.

But unless you personally know the owner of the horse, and since your horse is not boarded there anymore, I doubt there's much you can do for the situation, provided there really is a situation.

If the entire boarding scene has gone pretty far south at the barn, you might try turning the BO in but that is very risky business and not something one should do if they are under 21 and have no one to help them.

I am not trying to take away from what might be a severe situation for the horse in question - just trying to establish the facts.
This barn has been reported...I just found out the vet gave this report on this horse that was seen to have worms...
".....results came back very good, according to (vet) A fecal sample was sent for analysis on Saturday.

The results were 2 eggs per gram and the acceptable threshold is < 150 eggs per threshold." it goes on to say the vet said that based on this report "there is nothing to worry about"....? Do these numbers prove that? How could u actually SEE the worms and the numbers be acceptable?
Anyone?
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Old 06-01-2011, 10:33 PM  
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Fecal egg counts only could eggs in the manure. It does not catch all stages of worms, nor does it catch all worm types.

Recently we had a horse come in that obviously had pin worms but his fecal only came back positive for Stongyles. This horse was from a barn that dewormed regularly with Quest, but did not rotate and this horse apparently wasn't having his worm load dealt with under their program even though it was working for most of their horses.
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Old 06-02-2011, 11:29 AM  
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Originally Posted by EquineAlberta View Post
Fecal egg counts only could eggs in the manure. It does not catch all stages of worms, nor does it catch all worm types.

Recently we had a horse come in that obviously had pin worms but his fecal only came back positive for Stongyles. This horse was from a barn that dewormed regularly with Quest, but did not rotate and this horse apparently wasn't having his worm load dealt with under their program even though it was working for most of their horses.
Thanks fir the response
So basically what ur saying is this analysis isn't accurate? I mean it sounds confusing to me, between "thresholds" and "grams " what exactly is a threshold??
Thanks
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Old 06-02-2011, 12:51 PM  
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Not sure if this helps: http://www.equinews.com/article/moni...er-gram-counts
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Old 06-06-2011, 09:58 AM  
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Originally Posted by EquineAlberta View Post

thanks Karen that did help...i saw that horse yesterday, she seems to be ok..I did not see any worms present but I did not check her stool. Actually the skinny horses I reported looked like they gained a little since I was last there..I was very relieved to see that! Maybe bc they are on pasture now (when it doesn't rain only) But the place is disgustingly filthy with manure, i could not walk w/o stepping in manure, worse than when I was there boarding
So I get different opinions--some ppl say a horse with worms like that will die, some say she is better--I don't know what to think but I hope she continues to do well, if indeed she truly is getting better.
thank you!
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