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Old 01-08-2011, 09:44 PM  
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BAD Colic HELP

A gelding started colicing around 2 today. The owners are calling every vet in the area, but all are saying it's too late to come out. What can we do? No this guy is not my horse. I have a vet, they don't. Hence why known are willing to come out. They've been keeping him movig and up since 2 this afternoon!
HELP!
Of they got a hold of a shot of banamine. Didn't help him!
He's been kickig and bitin his stomach. Not drinking water now. He was shaking! What can they do?!? Plead don't bash that they don't have a vet. I yell at the all the time. My vet didn't answer. I just need suggestions!
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Old 01-08-2011, 09:59 PM  
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I once heard mineral oil helped and a nice trailer ride over bumpy roads also helps. But mind you I heard this so I am not a hundred percent sure this is true or not.
When my mini mare coliced we shot her up with banamine and walked for hours. My mom is a RN so she would listen to her guts alot and try to hear activity in her guts, gurgley sounds ect. Other then that, I dont think there is a whole lot you can do without a vet when it comes to colic. In my opinion, its a 50/50 chance their going to live or not, depends alot on how bad it is.

I am not a vet and only had one case of colic in my whole life with horses (knock on wood) but I would keep calling any Vet you can get a hold of and keep up with the banamine and walking.

Just remembered something that might be helpful, but my mother at the time of my mare colicing wanted to run a tube down her nose and into her stomach to start getting water in her. But I wouldnt try this unless there is someone who knows how to do one.
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Old 01-08-2011, 10:05 PM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KendalKL View Post
A gelding started colicing around 2 today.
The owners are calling every vet in the area, but all are saying it's too late to come out.
What can we do?
No this guy is not my horse.
I have a vet, they don't.
why known are willing to come out.
They've been keeping him movig and up since 2 this afternoon!
HELP!
Of they got a hold of a shot of banamine.
Didn't help him!
He's been kickig and bitin his stomach.
Not drinking water now. He was shaking!
What can they do?!? Plead don't bash that they don't have a vet.
I yell at the all the time. My vet didn't answer.
I just need suggestions!
Don't overdo the walking him either as it may tire him out when he needs his energy.
Let him rest if need be, just walk him, or get him up so he doesn't throw himself down, and twist something internally from any violent rolling.
Try to offer him some warm water, NO GRAIN, and only hay if he starts to feel better.

I believe you would need to give 1cc of Banamine for every 100 lbs of horse's weight (so about 10 cc's of banamine would be the dosage for a 1000 lb horse).

Shame on the vet's for not responding to an emergency call, former patient or not!!

I hope he gets straightened out and is better tomorrow.
Good luck, and keep a cool head about you.
Don't let panic cloud your judgment.
Keep calling the vets, even if they have to talk you thru it over the phone.

Please keep us posted
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Old 01-08-2011, 10:18 PM  
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Thanks guys!
I'm mad that no vet will come out too!
I'm at home texting my boyfriend to help his family!
I doubt they gave enough banamine then.
And apparently they called their dogs vet who was an equine vet. He is still a breeder and manages his own horses. He's heading over!
Hope it'll be ok.
The horse belongs to an 11 year old girl.
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Old 01-08-2011, 10:20 PM  
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i heard to use some milk of magnesia and take a syringe and shoot it in their mouth like wormer... though im not sure exactly how much or what kind of horse it is.. but the ones i saw it used one were big maybe 17h horses (big fat ones though) and they used a whole syringe... one of the big fat ones not the little shot ones.... just have to keep the horse moving and not let him roll till someone can come out too... im not a vet its just what ive seen done before... also posted this in an apparent double thread...
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Old 01-08-2011, 10:27 PM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KendalKL View Post
Thanks guys!
I'm mad that no vet will come out too!
I'm at home texting my boyfriend to help his family!
I doubt they gave enough banamine then.
And apparently they called their dogs vet who was an equine vet. He is still a breeder and manages his own horses. He's heading over!
Hope it'll be ok.
The horse belongs to an 11 year old girl.
One thing I did was never to be shy with the banamine. A colicing horse will keel over dead because of the colic before a slight overdose in banamine
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Old 01-08-2011, 10:34 PM  
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I second redboy's advice about not over doing the walking. I've been told it's ok to let them lay down to rest, as long as they don't roll. My concern there is that if they are laying down it's almost impossible to stop them from rolling if they start. Standing still to rest is fine, just be ready to move if the horse starts to lay down.
Glad to hear a vet is on the way! Please let us know what happens!
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Old 01-09-2011, 05:38 AM  
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Wow no vet will come out. sad that they do not have any
conscience.
My vet gives one cc for every hundred pounds.
hopefully this horse is better today but does not sound good with the description.
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Old 01-09-2011, 06:40 AM  
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That's why having a good relationship with a vet is so important! I am glad they are getting a vet out. Our hay guy was talking to us about this stuff (I don't know its name) that a friend sells that you can give when colic starts, supposedly it really helps, I wish I knew what it was called, I would like to keep some on hand for any future problems.

BUt you would be amazed at what a trailer ride can do. My horse was supposedly impacted, by the time we got to the hospital ( a 3 hr ride) he was just fine... although they kept him for "observation" and ended up with a big bill A friend's horse had twisted it's cecum, they trailered it up to another hospital, once again, by the time they got there it had untwisted. And yet another friend (no vet would come out) had a horse that was choking, they started to trailer it to the emergency vet but turned around bcause the horse was fine. I guess a trailer ride just vibrates things loose
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Old 01-09-2011, 09:29 AM  
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I helped out with a colic case once, we put the horse in the trailer to go to the vet, he immediately lay down and tried to roll and ended up cast in the trailer. So be careful. What happened, is he ok now?
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Old 01-09-2011, 09:47 AM  
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Any update this morning?
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Old 01-09-2011, 09:59 AM  
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I am just dealing with an impaction colic in my old mare right now. If I had no vet to help....Lordy, that is just horrific!!! I would get a hold of injectable or paste Banamine, top dose is 10cc's for injectable and dose for 1000 pounds in paste. If it is going to help, it usually takes about 20 to 45 minutes to help. I would walk the horse in an area with grass but sometimes people make the mistake of walking the horse, nearly to death! The next thing I would try is warm water and mineral oil ( NOT CORN OIL OR ANY OTHER KIND OF OIL.... IT HAS TO BE MINERAL OIL) administered with a turkey baster. The most ideal is a cathetar syrings... it has a larger opening tip and holds 60cc's of fluid. You don't want them to aspirate it but you want to get the liquid down even a little at a time. My vet tubed my horse last night with warm water and epson salts as her impaction was in the large intestine. If it is in the small intestine, mineral oil works better but you have no idea where the problem is. Bottom line, the horse needs a vet and I am really sorry no one will help you and especially the poor horse.

You can also take vitals on a horse. You need a stethoscope to listen for heart rate and gut sounds. Heart rate (have their left front leg forward) and listen kind of in the "armpit" of the horse. Normal rate is 40 beats per minute. Normal gut sounds are deep and rumbling. People imagine they DON'T need a stethoscope to hear gut sounds.... if a horse is normal they don't. You are dealing with a horse in colic so you want to listen for even the tiniest of sounds. Look at mouth tissue and capillary refill time. Mouth should be moist with saliva, and when you press on the tissue above the front teeth, it will blanch, and should immediately go back to pink. If there is any pause, the horse is circulatory system isn't working well.... and there is probably some dehydration.

The owner does need to think about options. Does she want to send the horse for surgery if that is necessary? It is a major expense for colic surgery and no guarantee's it will be successful. Around here it is about $10,000. The sad fact is the longer the horse has to wait, the less chance the horse has of surviving this even if it is a treatable impaction. So often, this time of year, it is an impaction type colic because some horses don't drink enough water because it is too cold. That type of a colic is usually correctable with tubing and supportive care. It is really sad if this horse dies, when it could have been treated with relatively minor actions. I am upset with the vets around your area.... and certainly not with you or the owner.

Praying for you and the horse. Sharon
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Old 01-09-2011, 10:42 AM  
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I truly hope the horse hasn't been sweating profusely. That's often a sign the blockage is at it's worst. When it ruptures the pain relief will be almost immediate and his coat will start drying, but then it's game over. Let's pray that the vet was able to help.
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Old 01-09-2011, 11:42 AM  
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So a vet came and pumped him with mineral oil and more banamine.
This morning he wasn't any better.
So we took him to a REALLY well known and liked Vet.
He's staying there at least for the night with fluids.
His heartrate is 80, when even a normal colic is 40.
She said he is really bad, and the blockage in his stomach might be leaking, which in that case nothing can be done.
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Old 01-09-2011, 11:48 AM  
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The horse has been sweating horribly.
He was also shaking, his gums are a kinda of pale purple color, so bad.
Banamine did nothing.
I'm hopeful but it's looking bad...
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Old 01-09-2011, 11:53 AM  
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Banamine is not going to help a colic, it will only mask some of the pain.
In fact, some vets are very upset when owners give a pain relief for colic , before they have a diagnosis.
Colic is just a general term for abdominal pain.If you have a spasmotic colic, then banamine is safe to give.
On the other hand, if you have a impaction colic, all banamine will do is mask some of the pain, while the actual reason for the colic becomes worse, with a simple obstruction progressing to one that needs surgery, or even to a fatal twist.
Yes, you can probably give enough banamine, having ahorse appear not that severely in pain, until the intestine actually ruptures or large areas of it die
Once there is a diagnosis, and some treatment for the obstruction has been given, it is okay to then give some banamine, but not as the only treatment of a colic-ever, unless you are sure it is a simple spasmotic colic
You have to get fluids into a horse , with electrolytes.
In the absence of a vet, that can pass a stomach tube, you can use a large syringe and just keep getting that fluid down there
Do not just give mineral oil by mouth, as it is tasteless, and horse have thus been known to get it into their lungs instead.
You can give them castor oil by syringe- and it will often help to move that obstruction along, if you haven't waited too long. I always keep some on hand, and if I ever think I have an impaction colic, give the horse about 20cc of castor oil, before the vet has time to get there. Often, the castor oil alone does the trick.
The longer you wait with an impaction colic, not treating the impaction, but just the pain, the more likely it developes into one that either needs surgery, or has a fatal rupture
My vet would just about string me up, if I ever gave banamine without addressing and diagnosing the cause of the colic first.
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Old 01-09-2011, 01:36 PM  
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has the horse had an ultrasound? What about an abdominal tap? This sounds horrible, but really sounds like the most humane thing to do is put him down. When my tb had an intestinal leak they tapped his belly, and the fluid was brownish. Should be clear. That should have been done to this horse I think, it's a really easy procedure, and then you know if there is a leakage and if the horses suffering should end. Mine unfortunately didn't turn out well. But at least he didn't suffer for days.
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Old 01-09-2011, 03:01 PM  
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I think they did that. I know they put a tube in his nose, pumped oil and water, then let it drain back out. Tons of fowl smelling old food and dak liquid came out. It was gross. We'll found out around between 8-10 if he's improving or not.
But even if he gets better, he may not make it. Apparently someone said within a year her horse died from the damage te leakage caused.
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Old 01-09-2011, 03:25 PM  
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Unfortunatly the outcome does not look good

Florida has been experiencing extremely cold weather this winter. Obviously, this horse hasn't been drinking enough or has any effort being made to entise the drinking. This impaction didn't come overnight.

Why everyone needs to monitor water intake and their horses "output" - urination and poo's.

So sad.
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Old 01-09-2011, 03:33 PM  
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My vet would just about string me up, if I ever gave banamine without addressing and diagnosing the cause of the colic first.
Apparently these people don't have a vet, and no vet's were returning calls,
or coming to the aid of the horse from 2 PM until 11:45 PM last night,...,.
Banamine was suggested in an effort to help the animal with it's pain.
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