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Old 03-12-2008, 07:04 PM  
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Question what does "in your pocket" mean?

when a horse is described as "in your pocket" what does this statement mean? sorry just a bit confused, i hope this doesnt sound like a stupid question. thanks
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Old 03-12-2008, 07:06 PM  
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I think it means that they kind of follow you around; i.e. is friendly.

Im not 100 percent sure though.
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Old 03-12-2008, 07:07 PM  
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Oh I can't believe it a question I know the answer to. Lily is an "in your pocket" kinda horse. Just loves attention, would literally climb in your pocket to go with you if she could. The joke around here is that one day Mike will come home and find her on the couch with me watching tv.
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Old 03-12-2008, 07:10 PM  
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sweet, nuzzling, likes being petted etc.
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Old 03-12-2008, 07:20 PM  
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"In your pocket"--they just want to be with you, and do what ever you're doing. I always think of the Arabians as a breed who is an in your pocket breed.

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Old 03-12-2008, 07:22 PM  
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To me an "In your pocket" horse is one that very easy to get along with, easy to train and very easy to be around. It is a horse that always wants to be with you rather than herd members and such.
That's what in your pocket means to me.
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Old 03-12-2008, 07:47 PM  
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Yep, what the others said. A "people" horse. One that chooses you over his companions, and generally makes a pain of himself when you're out there trying to fix the fence, to the point he's actually gotten tapped in the nose by accident when sneaking up behind you to see what you're doing.

Not that I'm referring to any of mine in particular, mind you.
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Old 03-12-2008, 08:19 PM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GAGIRL View Post
Oh I can't believe it a question I know the answer to. Lily is an "in your pocket" kinda horse. Just loves attention, would literally climb in your pocket to go with you if she could. The joke around here is that one day Mike will come home and find her on the couch with me watching tv.
lol i would love to see that.

thanks everyone the horse i am going to see saturday was described as "in your pocket" and i thaught that might be what it meant but glad i have you all to clarify this for me! thanks!
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Old 03-13-2008, 08:40 AM  
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Don't want to rain on anyones parade here. Sometimes the phrase indicates the good things folks here have already mentioned. But just be aware it can also mean a horse that doesn't really respect your space, even though it doesn't bite kick or anything like that, it is constantly in your personal space bugging you. Some people think that's great, but personally I want them to respect my space and NOT be in my pockets. When you go to look at the horse just try try to decide if the horse is just "freindly" or pushy.
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Old 03-13-2008, 08:53 AM  
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Originally Posted by Mule Fool View Post
Don't want to rain on anyones parade here. Sometimes the phrase indicates the good things folks here have already mentioned. But just be aware it can also mean a horse that doesn't really respect your space, even though it doesn't bite kick or anything like that, it is constantly in your personal space bugging you. Some people think that's great, but personally I want them to respect my space and NOT be in my pockets. When you go to look at the horse just try try to decide if the horse is just "freindly" or pushy.
interesting thaught... and that makes sense. i geuss i wont know til i see her.
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Old 03-13-2008, 09:02 AM  
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I agree with everyone else, but what MuleFool said is very true. We are working with my Mustang gelding for that very reason. I gave him to my sister about 6 years ago, and basically he's gotten his way since then. He's a very in your pocket, people horse. But he has forgotten he's so big and definitely gets in your space. He was a little obnoxious about it too, so you may want to make sure that they are just meaning friendly, and not over friendly. Good luck!
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Old 03-13-2008, 11:52 AM  
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I also agree with everyone as to what "in your pocket" refers to, and also agree with mule fool about not respecting your space. With proper training, the horse can learn to stay friendly, but to also be respectful.
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Old 03-13-2008, 11:56 AM  
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Friendly is great, but often people confuse disrespectful for friendly.

Be prepared to ask the horse to backup, lead, walk around objects with you, pick up their feet (front feet first ) If you can touch them all over.
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Old 03-13-2008, 12:01 PM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mule Fool View Post
Don't want to rain on anyones parade here. Sometimes the phrase indicates the good things folks here have already mentioned. But just be aware it can also mean a horse that doesn't really respect your space, even though it doesn't bite kick or anything like that, it is constantly in your personal space bugging you. Some people think that's great, but personally I want them to respect my space and NOT be in my pockets. When you go to look at the horse just try try to decide if the horse is just "freindly" or pushy.
I agree, Personaly I cant stand a "In your pocket type horse"
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Old 03-13-2008, 12:15 PM  
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I've heard both sides of the "friendly" vs. "respecting space" issue.

I went to go try out a gorgeous grey dapple gelding and the owner said he was really affectionate.

When I got there, the owner's friend told me to throw my elbows up if he tried to rub on me.

I thought it sounded like overkill, until she told her daughter to take her jacket off and show us the scars on her shoulder from when the horse had "affectionately rubbed" on her... with his bridle on. The metal had just torn her arm up.

Honestly, he struck me as a very friendly large puppy dog - but it was an eye-opener to see what kind of danger it can pose if there are no boundaries. He'd knock you over rubbing and leaning so hard.

Just make sure it's the level of affection you want. In my experience, it's easier to tone down an affectionate horse, than it is to turn a disinterested horse into a lover.
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Old 03-13-2008, 12:24 PM  
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I guess that would not be fun..

To us, in your pocket means friendly but respectful - we don't allow anything else.. However I am beginning to realize that this is not always the case after reading some of your posts..
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Old 03-13-2008, 12:32 PM  
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the woman described her as inquisative...telling me about a time when they were working on the fence and she came over to see what they were up to, picked up the bag of nails that proceeded to go all over the place...i dont know plus i see that different people have different opinions on what this is to them.
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Old 03-13-2008, 12:38 PM  
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I agree with rkbuffy - it is an easy problem to resolve.. and most people would rather have an affectionte horse then a working one.. Me, I really don't care.. They are not disrespectful with us long enough for it to matter..
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Old 03-13-2008, 12:40 PM  
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I agree with rkbuffy - it is an easy problem to resolve.. and most people would rather have an affectionte horse then a working one.. Me, I really don't care.. They are not disrespectful with us long enough for it to matter..
thanks gbar that makes pretty good sense.
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Old 03-14-2008, 03:45 AM  
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You can have the best of both worlds. Yes, Lily is a very affectionate horse, but also she is a very respectful one. Never, ever invades your space until invited to do so.
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