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Old 06-04-2005, 09:23 PM  
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Just started riding-can't keep my butt in the saddle!

I just recently started riding on a freinds horse. I ride just for fun, I'm really not that into the whole show thing but I'd really like to learn all I can about horses and riding. Even though I don't have my own horse . I noticed that I bounce around alot in the saddle (it's a western saddle). does anybody have any tips on how to stop bouncing so much? I appreciate any replies.
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Old 06-04-2005, 11:44 PM  
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Posting!

basically, as the horse moves, you will feel him move up and down beneath you.....as he moves, count along with the beat. On every other UP beat, let yourself rise out of the saddle and gently back into it. When you do it right, you will feel as if the horse was floating under you. Another way to look at it is to try to half-stand in the saddle, and let the horse rise beneath you. Remember to keep your toes pointed up in the stirrups and slightly out from the horse.

the other thing is getting a good "seat" sometimes called "balance"...it amouts to strenthening the muscles in your legs so you can hold onto the horse with your calves (not your thighs or feet)

The very best thing you could do would be to take a course of riding lessons from an experience instructor. Not only will you learn all the cues corectly, you will also get to ride some nicely trained horses.
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Old 06-04-2005, 11:53 PM  
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Use your knees! NOT your ankles.
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Old 06-05-2005, 08:58 AM  
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thanx you guys that feels sooo much better
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Old 06-05-2005, 09:31 AM  
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Heres an easy way to remember to post at the trot:

If you are riding in a ring or arena:
Rise and Fall with the shoulder on the wall...
In other words your outside shoulder.

If you are trail riding etc...
Remember to switch the rise to each shoulder every now and then, much easier on you and your horse.

Karen
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Old 06-05-2005, 10:30 PM  
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If you need some extra help tack shops do sell a product called saddle tite, and some simliar stuff that is some sort of wax that is supposed to help you stick to your saddle better. I've never tried it before, other than on my slippery reins, and it seemed to work on those. I'm sure it can't hurt.

If you're having a hard time getting a hang of how to post you could also try getting your horse to slow down a little at the trot and sit really deep in your saddle.

No matter what you try you will get the hang of it with time and pratice.[/list]
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Old 06-05-2005, 10:45 PM  
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NO BOUNCE HORSES

Take it from a Pro the only way to stop bouncing in the saddle is to ride a PASO FINO.

Respectfully submitted

Squeaks aka Bob
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Old 06-05-2005, 11:16 PM  
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hmm. Posting is great for now... but it's really considered something that you do in the english saddle... mainly because the "ideal" western horse is supposed to have a well balanced and collected (and slow) trot.. my horse doesn't understand this AT ALL... but it is the "ideal".

To get used to trotting without posting, there are two things that I used. First of all, riding bareback will give you all the balance and training you'll ever need. It's muy slippery and scary at first, but once you get the hang of it, it's amazing. You can feel so much more of the horse and learn a lot more that way.

Another simpler answer is to lengthen your stirrups so you can't rely on them. sit up straight and keep your hand (hands for english) near the horse's neck.. the other on your leg. keep your heels down... but as long as you concentrate on sitting up straight and sitting deep in the saddle, you'll be just fine.
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Old 06-05-2005, 11:30 PM  
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Riding bareback, just as Jaxie said, will probably help you with your balance and seat. To help with the "slipperiness" you may want to try getting a bareback pad, which will also keep you nice and clean.
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Old 06-06-2005, 05:46 AM  
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NO BOUNCE!!

The Walking Horse or Kentucky Mountain Saddle Horse is the only way to go for that "bounceless" ride! Try one out if you can and "feel" the difference.
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Old 06-06-2005, 07:43 AM  
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Oh, Bob, too funny! That wasn't a sales pitch was it?!

Learning to have a good seat first takes time and practice. The first and foremost thing to remember is to breathe! Seriously! Deep, cleansing breaths will settle your own body to conform with the movement of the horse. I find that it helps to close my eyes (!), breathe and allow myself to follow the motion of the horse. And this is any horse, from the choppy TB, the joggin QH, or the big moving Warmblood.

There is much to be said for posting, but until you build up the muscles in your legs, and learn the rhythm, it can be difficult. That said, learning to sit the trot (or jog, whathaveyou) takes more concentration, but will pay off in the long run. When you connect with the horse, your seat will improve.

And learning to ride bareback is, in my opinion, the very best thing a beginner can do, on the right horse, of course! That way you are able to feel the parts of the horse moving underneath you and connect to that movement with your own parts. Eventually, it all becomes one movement...

A side question, is your saddle the right size? If it's too big, you may be more likely to swim around in there.
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Old 06-06-2005, 01:18 PM  
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Quote:
Use your knees! NOT your ankles.
You do not want to use your knees! That is not going to keep your butt in the saddle. In fact, it will actually pop you out of the saddle even more, and make you more prone to a fall should your horse trip, stumble, or lose his balance.
Pinching with your knees causes the center of gravity to rise. (You will feel like you are squeezing yourself out of the saddle.)
When posting (rising) at the trot, you should keep your knees soft and allow more weight to sink into the heels, which allows the hips go forward in rhythm with the horse's trot. Don't worry about "standing" too much when you post. Allow the horse's movement to thrust you out of the saddle. The point of posting is not the height, but the rhythm.
NEVER NEVER NEVER grip with your knees. You'll pop right off!
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Old 06-06-2005, 04:01 PM  
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Well put jmprider! Gripping with your knees is ahuge no no. I don't think I could add anything to your post...you pretty much said everything I would.
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Old 06-06-2005, 04:34 PM  
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Why, thank you, horses4sale! Rereading my post right now, I must say, I think I did a nice job on it too! Hee hee!

Lisa
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Old 06-06-2005, 10:56 PM  
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whilst I agree partially with jmprider and horses4sale, I do not agree entirely. Weight should be properly proportioned between the knees and the heels. Relying entirely on the stirrups for your balance isn't a great idea.. as you can much more easily (especially when you don't have experienced balance) throw that poor saddle out of balance itself, and soon find yourself riding underneath your steed. (or on the ground, at that.. hehe) The important thing is to connect with the horse and not put all of your pressure and weight into a one area... it takes time and practire to feel what is right.
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Old 06-07-2005, 05:05 AM  
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Just started riding

I have to tell you all a little story about Cynthia She started showing on Jazz last year and was herself a "greenhorn" along with her horse She had an awful time staying in her saddle and found herself on the ground several times It was embarrassing
I said, ok I know what she needs to work on. Next two weeks she rode without the saddle. I knew she would learn to balance herself on Jazz's back without relying on the saddle and horn to keep her in. Did the trick and she has kept her seat with every twist and turn now So I have to agree with the bareback riding for learning true balance. Do it in an areana or round pen tho till you are sure of yourself and have learned to keep your seat Happy and safe riding. Stormy
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Old 06-07-2005, 10:42 AM  
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Iwould acturally suggest starting out in a small pasture, or portable round pen, Arenas and round pens with footings tend to make for hard landings I'd rather and in than hit the bluestone again.
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Old 06-07-2005, 01:05 PM  
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Jaxie -

Neither horses4sale nor myself said to use your stirrup for balance or support. That would be incorrect riding as well.
You do need to sink your weight into your lower leg and heels. That is your base of support while riding.
Quote:
as you can much more easily (especially when you don't have experienced balance) throw that poor saddle out of balance itself, and soon find yourself riding underneath your steed.
There is no amount of pressure that you can put in your lower leg that is going to throw your saddle "off balance," (unless it is uneven weight) putting you under your horse. If this occurs, you have alot more problems than just putting weight in your lower leg. (Your upper body balance has to be off as well, and your girth extremely loose.)
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Old 06-07-2005, 03:02 PM  
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As a moderator, I'm going to step in here.

We all share different perspectives on riding well. There is no "right way" to ride. The whole idea should be safety first, and fun second. Everything else falls into fringe benefits.

And what it means to be a good rider cannot be measured by status. I've seen many a great trail rider that could give an event rider a run for the money.

Sometimes our meaning is lost when typing words on a screen, as it's hard to convey in words, what we sometimes only see in pictures in our heads. It's hard to relate our picture to others and come across clearly sometimes.
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Old 06-07-2005, 03:58 PM  
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Once again jmprider I couldn't agree more! You seem to beat me to it every time!
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