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Old 12-31-2011, 02:16 PM  
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My dog's tooth is loose should I pull it?

My French Bulldog, Butters, is about 8-9 yrs old. She is very healthy except for one bad tooth in front/bottom. It is discolored. Yesterday I noticed it is halfway out of her gums and loose! She is acting fine, eating/drinking normally, playful, affectionate as usual, no signs of discomfort.
Should I let it come out by itself or try to pull it? It's still pretty firmly in there.....really don't want to go to a vet if possible, still paying off a huge vet bill from last year when she had emergency surgery, but of course i will take her if i need to.

thanks for any advice.

Last edited by CarolNoelle : 12-31-2011 at 02:20 PM.
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Old 12-31-2011, 03:09 PM  
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I would take her to the vet and just get his/her opinion. They may say that it is ok to leave it alone and let it fall out on its own but then again you dont want food to fall into the hole and get it infected and then its gonna cost more to get all the medications and then the dental surgery to fix everything. Sometimes it a quite pull.

I was working and I had a little frenchie come in with a loose tooth and the owner said just to take it out cause it has causing the pain, so we knocked the dog out and it seriously only took like 3 minutes and it was out. It ended up only costing the owner like 300 bucks cause it was so short.
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Old 12-31-2011, 03:19 PM  
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I'd recommend a vet visit too,
i work for a vet and often see dogs with teeth just .. hanging there... It comes from poor dental health.. or just teeth problems.

Seems to me like she either broke that tooth a while ago or it just rotted.
A discolored tooth is a dead tooth.

I would say to just pull it, but you have to make sure it's not a broken tooth with the root still there.
Also you don't want infection- especially if the tooth is rotting. so the dog needs to be on anitbiotics.

If you pull the tooth and the root, or root piece is still there... it could cause an abcess or infection and lead to more problems.

A vet trip today will save $$$$ tomorrow
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Old 12-31-2011, 03:26 PM  
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Vet visit...she may need antibiotics if there is infection. Infection in the mouth can cause serious problems.
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Old 12-31-2011, 03:48 PM  
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$300? that's ALOT to have a dog's tooth pulled! Still paying off the $1300 surgery she had last year
ok I am going to watch it over the weekend, go to vet next week after the holiday if still needed. Here's the thing...I bought this sweet pup from a woman who only had her 6 mos (she had to give up her pets, I have her cat too, who pees outside her litter box sometimes but that's another story.....) and this woman got her from a breeder who almost bred her to death, did not care for her or her teeth. But the dog is the sweetest dog I ever had...the tooth was always discolored and her breath was always bad... years ago when I first got her checked the vet wanted to scale her teeth for tarter, I said no bc I did not want her anesthetized. probably should've had it yanked then but I was scared of putting her under not knowing her exact med history.
I'll monitor her closely.
thanks for all the advice.

Last edited by CarolNoelle : 12-31-2011 at 03:54 PM.
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Old 12-31-2011, 04:50 PM  
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Well i still would have a dental done on her. I know many people are concerned about putting their animals under, but in reality it's not bad at all.
The Vet runs pre-operative bloodwork to make sure all the kidney and liver and blood values are good and also a packed cell volume ( PCV) with also measures blood cell volume- also they will set an IV catheter and fluids.
I know when i monitor my patients I'm always monitoring, temp, bloodpressure, heart , breathing.

I've been in the field for 5 years and have only see 1 animal die under anesthesia.. well he actually wasn't really under.. We had just gotten him under and he crashed. Not sure what exactly happened.. I know the owner did not want bloodwork down.. in hindsight had the O pushed for bloodwork. they might have saved the dog.


anyways if she has one bad tooth and was never really taken care of.. then chances are she may have even more problem teeth you don't know about. Only dental radiographs can show that.

Ask your vet about payment plans too!
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Old 12-31-2011, 05:09 PM  
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I am in agreement with the take-little-frenchie-to-the-vet crowd. I used to be a dental assistant and a dark tooth is non-vital, abcessed but this would just be the tip of the iceberg. No doubt this doggie needs some more dental work done. He will also probably have to go on a course of antibiotics post-op. just to be on the safe side.

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!
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Last edited by Sharon Danielson : 12-31-2011 at 05:12 PM.
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Old 12-31-2011, 06:19 PM  
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I think pulling it would be a bad idea. I think I'd watch it, but if it didn't come out in a couple days, I'd go see the vet.

I've never encountered teeth problems in dogs, but growing up we had a cat with a tooth abcess. It ended badly because nobody took her to the vet.

My BIL had a cat with bad breath for a long time and the vet finally decided to pull a couple teeth, afterwards, no more bad breath.
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Old 01-01-2012, 07:57 AM  
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I wouldn't put a brachycephalic with previous health problems and unknown health history either OP. Unless it was an unavoidable life threatening emergency it just wouldn't be worth the risk.

I also wouldn't pull it though. There's just too much that can go wrong with that as well.

If I were you I'd offer some really great chews in hopes she'll be able to work it out on her own. Of course stay away from rawhides but puzzle sticks are good, filled frozen kings that she'll really have to work that front tooth to manipulate or a big raw meaty bone would work well.

I refuse to scale or have someone scale my dogs teeth, it completely annihilates their enamel and can introduce serious infection along the gumline. For long term dental health offering raw meaty bones works best, although we don't need to brushing obviously works well sometimes also. You can buy a spray called Petzlife I believe is what its called. Spray, wait, and shortly after you can gently brush away years of build up without paying a fortune, putting your dog at risk with the anesthesia or causing their teeth any permanent damage with the scaling.

My guys went from all needing expensive dentals badly (one of whom is also a brachy breed) to having the teeth of a six month old puppy just from raw feeding them.
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Old 01-01-2012, 03:08 PM  
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If your dog is pretty gentle a vet might be able to get away with just a local and a yank. I think the doggie should be put on a round of anitibiotics just in case, that's really why I would reccomened the vet.
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Old 01-01-2012, 03:15 PM  
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You might have your cat checked to. Cats that usually go outside their litter boxes sometimes are trying to tell you they have a urinary infection.
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Old 01-01-2012, 03:50 PM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jess View Post
I wouldn't put a brachycephalic with previous health problems and unknown health history either OP. Unless it was an unavoidable life threatening emergency it just wouldn't be worth the risk.

I also wouldn't pull it though. There's just too much that can go wrong with that as well.

If I were you I'd offer some really great chews in hopes she'll be able to work it out on her own. Of course stay away from rawhides but puzzle sticks are good, filled frozen kings that she'll really have to work that front tooth to manipulate or a big raw meaty bone would work well.

I refuse to scale or have someone scale my dogs teeth, it completely annihilates their enamel and can introduce serious infection along the gumline. For long term dental health offering raw meaty bones works best, although we don't need to brushing obviously works well sometimes also. You can buy a spray called Petzlife I believe is what its called. Spray, wait, and shortly after you can gently brush away years of build up without paying a fortune, putting your dog at risk with the anesthesia or causing their teeth any permanent damage with the scaling.

My guys went from all needing expensive dentals badly (one of whom is also a brachy breed) to having the teeth of a six month old puppy just from raw feeding them.

yeah don't like putting animals under unless life threatening, esp this lil girl.
thanks for the advice, i will try the raw meaty bones and guess what, i considered that tartar spray before, now I think I will actually try it

will keep everyone posted..she's doing fine.
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Old 01-01-2012, 03:58 PM  
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You might have your cat checked to. Cats that usually go outside their litter boxes sometimes are trying to tell you they have a urinary infection.

she's been doing this ever since we moved to this new house 2 yrs ago. I've had her since she was a year old, almost 4 years now. She doesn't seem to like her litter so we tried everything, 2 litter boxes, "Cat Attract" litter, keeping the boxes immaculate...she was spayed and declawed all fours when she was very young and I think that did something to her psychologically. She is very very quiet, very sweet, playful, and scans with her eyes alot ....I think she was traumatized. People tell me they would put her down
for her behavior but that's INSANE to me...i will never give her up, she's part of the family, she's happy, and very loved. She's mine for life...
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Old 01-01-2012, 05:19 PM  
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Dog teeth are like icebergs, in that there is as much or more tooth in the jaw than what you see. Please do not try to do dentistry on your dog. So this is another vote for going to the vet. In addition as has been stated, a dark colored tooth is a sign of damage and your dog may develop an infection. Infections in the mouth can be deadly, and this is no exaggeration. Schoen damaged a canine chewing on (his last) knuckle bone. He then had a root canal which cost me a total of $1200.
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Old 01-06-2012, 05:53 PM  
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update: Butters lost her tooth!

Butters' tooth came out by itself yesterday (YAY!) uneventfully...I checked her in the am and early pm, was gone until night, noticed it was gone when she snuggled up next to me in bed like usual, and started licking me like she does. The gum looks fine, she looks fine...I think she's gonna be just fine, altho she looks kinda funny w/o it can't find the darn tooth anywhere! Hope she didn't swallow it

I'll continue to keep an eye on her
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Old 01-06-2012, 09:06 PM  
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I'm so glad to hear the tooth issue is over in a good way! I hadn't said anything because I had no advise/experience.
There are so many reasons a cat may pee outside the box! You've done the cleaning and numbers. There's also location, size of box and do not use scented litters! Cats hate that nasty perfumed stuff! I like using those storage boxes that slide under the bed. The sides are low enough for even kitties with arthritis yet big enough for even the BIG guys!! If her paws are sensitive, one of the many declawing hazards, you might check out the Feline Pine clumping. That stuff is sooooo soft!
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Old 01-09-2012, 10:30 PM  
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I'm so glad to hear the tooth issue is over in a good way! I hadn't said anything because I had no advise/experience.
There are so many reasons a cat may pee outside the box! You've done the cleaning and numbers. There's also location, size of box and do not use scented litters! Cats hate that nasty perfumed stuff! I like using those storage boxes that slide under the bed. The sides are low enough for even kitties with arthritis yet big enough for even the BIG guys!! If her paws are sensitive, one of the many declawing hazards, you might check out the Feline Pine clumping. That stuff is sooooo soft!
thank you for the advice on my kitty Sophie she is soooo sweet! Like I said very quiet, not very vocal at all and when she meows you can barely hear her. She is unlike any cat I have ever had. I will NEVER give her up. I have tried every litter, multiple boxes, even "Cat Attract" litter..I was thinking of retraining her by putting her in a large crate with her box in it, lik ethey do puppies but not sure that's the way to go..? I'll do anything to solve the problem, as hard as I keep on top of it and keep her box and the house clean I think my house smells like cat
I love her thogh...she is a cutie..let's see if I have a pic of her, and Butters ...
BUTTERS AND SOPHIE
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Old 01-10-2012, 10:18 AM  
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She is beautiful! Butters is a cutie too!
Yes, using a small area, like a bathroom or a large crate, can be used to help train. Containing a cat or kitten is recommended when introducing to a new place or when extra help is needed with a litter box issue. Are there particular spots that she goes? Puppy pads come in handy sometimes! Any spot that has been peed on needs to be thoroughly cleaned with cleaners made for the job, check out pet supply stores. I have heard vinegar can be good though.
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Old 01-11-2012, 11:01 AM  
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Glad your pets are doing ok.

Jess- When I'm done scaling a pets teeth- and we use an ultrasonic tool at my work, we polish the teeth so the teeth are perfectly fine.
It's bascially the same way we humans get our teeth scaled and polished.
When done correctly it does NOT negatively effect the tooth enamel.
Dogs are their own through chewing create cracks and tiny ridges which need to be polished smooth in order to avoid bacteria from forming in those tiny micro cracks.

Good luck
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Old 01-11-2012, 12:15 PM  
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Have you tried putting puppy pads around the box when I cat sit my mom's she is so big that her but will sometime stick over the box cause she likes to pee in the corners and I put the pads down.
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